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Originals

We're hiring! Looking for a Pittsburgh-based environmental health reporter

We want enterprising, creative reporting on the winners and losers of environmental decisions in Western Pennsylvania – and to show how those decisions ripple out across the country.

We're looking to shine a light on the environmental health challenges and opportunities confronting residents of Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania. If you're capable of writing fearless stories that draw a local and national audience, we want to hear from you.

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kticradio.com

Farm groups meet to examine role of agriculture in building climate resiliency.

The idea of climate adaptation is taking hold in traditionally conservative farm organizations.

Here's a worthy read from Nebraska Rural Radio Association about how climate adaptation is coming to agriculture.

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Energy & Health Newsletter
www.alleghenyfront.org

Cleaning up coal: Future or folly?

What actually is clean coal? Depending who you ask, it could be a historical reference, a fantasy or an evolving technology.

Is “clean coal” an oxymoron or an innovative energy source that will help us beat climate change?
Originals

Help make science loud in 2018 - support our work today

We were strong in 2017, thanks to engaged readers like you. Let's keep that work going in the New Year.

I'm proud of our work over the past year. Engaged readers like you made it possible, and I hope you'll take a moment to see what impact you had – and what opportunities lie ahead of us. Because you should be proud, too.

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Originals

'... and it confounds the science.'

The Parody Project takes on Donald Trump's alt-facts.

The Parody Project published this nicely done spoof back in August. Sadly, it remains relevant today. Now it's going viral with the science crowd.

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Originals

Soils reveal a hidden cost of farming, and fertilizers

In one Montana ag basin, drinking wells test at twice the federal health standard for nitrate pollution. That's a problem on many levels. Montana State researchers are working with farmers to solve it.

For every ton of fertilizer farmers apply to fields in the United States, almost 1,200 pounds is wasted due to inefficiency, with almost 400 pounds of that waste flushing into streams and aquifers.

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