At the Women's March, a call for climate protection, too.
Douglas Fischer

At the Women's March, a call for climate protection, too.

Amid a sea of signs and pink hats, plenty of people also marched for environment and climate science.

Jan. 22, 2017


Amid a sea of signs and pink hats, plenty of people also marched for environment and climate science.

By Douglas Fischer

The Daily Climate

WASHINGTON—One day into President Donald Trump's term, a new resistance emerged in the United States, and it's not just about gender equality and women's rights:

There's a call for good science, good journalism, real facts.

To be sure, the predominant theme at Women's Marches big and small across the nation and globe Saturday was that "this pussy bites back" and "love trumps hate." But a noticeable subset of marchers also called for strong climate science, a stand against environmental rollbacks, and better environmental education. 

Here's a sampling of that theme on display on the Mall Saturday in Washington, D.C.

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