WATCH: A global fertility crisis

"Reproduction is a basic human right ... to have that taken away from you from causes that are not within your control is what I'm most concerned about."

Dr. Shanna H. Swan, one of the world's leading environmental and reproductive epidemiologists, teamed up with animation specialists, After Skool, to outline the impact of environmental exposures on men's and women's reproductive health.


Swan, a professor of environmental medicine and public health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City and adjunct scientist at Environmental Health Sciences (publisher of EHN), discusses how this rise in infertility cannot be explained simply by genetics, but is, in part, resulting from exposure to "hormone hackers"—compounds known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals—found in everyday plastics and other products throughout the world.

Last year Swan released a groundbreaking book Count Down: How Our Modern World Is Threatening Sperm Counts, Altering Male and Female Reproductive Development, and Imperiling the Future of the Human Race.

Check out the video above, and visit After Skool's Youtube page for other cool animations.

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