(Credit: Ben White/Unsplash)

It is time to respect the planet’s boundaries—and overhaul how we eat and waste food—if we want to feed our rising population

If we're to feed the estimated 10 billion people on Earth in 2050—and protect the planet— we have to completely overhaul food production and choose healthier diets, says international report

The way we eat and grow food has to dramatically change if we're going to feed the world's increasing population by 2050 and protect the planet, according to a major report released today from the EAT-Lancet Commission.

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Desalination plant outfall at San Ramón (Credit: Alan Harper/flickr)

Desalination plants are on the rise—so is their salty, chemical waste

The rise of desalination plants, now almost 16,000 worldwide, has led to a glut of brine waste—much of which is dumped into oceans, which can raise salinity to dangerous levels and put toxic chemicals in the marine environment threatening ocean life, according to a new study.

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The flame retardant PolyFR is mostly used in insulation. (Credit: Ernie Seckinger/flickr)

“Environmentally friendly” flame retardants break down into potentially toxic chemicals

A purported "eco-friendly" flame retardant breaks down into smaller, possibly harmful chemicals when exposed to heat and ultraviolet light, according to a study from German researchers.

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Credit: Connor Mulvaney

Year-in-review: Integrating impact

As reporters, we're used to asking questions.

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Credit: Moms Clean Air Force/flickr

Industry studies show evidence of bias and misleading conclusions on widely used insecticide: Scientists

Researchers who examined Dow Chemical Company-sponsored animal tests performed two decades ago on the insecticide chlorpyrifos found inaccuracies in what the company reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency compared to what the data showed.

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Whimbrel on the tundra on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska. (Credit: Rachel Richardson, USGS, Alaska Science Center)

Shorebird egg theft is becoming a big problem in the Arctic. And climate change is behind it.

For centuries, the Arctic has been a relatively safe place for shorebirds such as plovers and sandpipers to lay their eggs, as nests in the tropics were much more likely to suffer attacks from predators.

That is changing.

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Credit: Stephen Hamilton

Bugs are full of our drugs—and they could be getting other critters hooked, too

Insects near streams are taking in loads of pharmaceutical drugs and can pass the compounds on to predators higher in the food chain, such as frogs, birds and bats, according to a new study.

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