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Every day our crew of researchers and journalists are scanning the web, looking for insightful news articles on key environmental health topics.

Our population newsletter is designed to give a weekly snapshot of the interplay between a growing population and environmental stressors — this means stories on climate driven migration, food insecurity, water scarcity.

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Today's top news

Op-ed: Arming doctors with knowledge about PFAS pollution

A new course and report on PFAS-related health effects can empower patients, promote life-saving screening and help tackle the continued devastating health effects of PFAS chemicals.

From our newsroom

Peter Dykstra: Public disservants

A quartet of Interior Secretaries who gave the rest a bad name.

Evidence of PFAS in sanitary and incontinence pads

The findings come on the heels of other testing that found the forever chemicals in some popular tampons.

EU’s new climate change plan will cause biodiversity loss and deforestation: Analysis

In a plan full of sustainable efforts, the incentivizing of biomass burning has climate experts concerned.

Op-ed: It’s time to re-think the United Nations’ COP climate negotiations

Instead of focusing on negotiations, let the main event be information sharing, financing and partnerships that produce faster technological change.

LISTEN: Beau Taylor Morton on the power of community organizing

“People can see you engaged and wanting to begin the work, not only as a researcher, but you’re invested in the community.”