Here’s what we’ve learned about hurricanes since Sandy
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Here’s what we’ve learned about hurricanes since Sandy

2017 has been a wild year for hurricanes - and as a result scientists - according to Rebecca Leber - understand a lot more about how climate change affects extreme weather.


It turns out we often ask what we can learn from various catastrophic weather events and other ecological disasters:

    • According to Joe Romm at ThinkProgress, Hurricane Sandy was a wakeup call that the GOP, Donald Trump, and the media refuse to answer.
    • Of course, catastrophes don't just happen on the east coast. The west coast is vulnerable as well, and Nicholas Pinter of UC Davis says states like California need to think about and improve their flood management strategies.
    • Scientists have stuff to learn too; in particular, they are researching what ocean acidification means for marine ecosystems.
    • Finally, Amy Davidson Sorkin of the New Yorker asks what Donald Trump learned from his post-Hurricane Harvey visit to Texas.
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