How Monsanto captured the EPA—and twisted science—to keep glyphosate on the market
inthesetimes.com

How Monsanto captured the EPA—and twisted science—to keep glyphosate on the market

This must read, two-year investigation by Valerie Brown and the late Elizabeth Grossman found "incontrovertible evidence that Monsanto has exerted deep influence over EPA decisions since glyphosate first came on the market—via Roundup—more than 40 years ago."


Together the authors examine how Monsanto selectively interpreted toxicity studies, manipulated science, and aggressively smeared a small non-profit called Moms Across America, a group that detected glyphosate in breast milk samples in a small 2014 study. The organization's founder, Zen Honeycutt, was criticized for the testing because it was not a "formal scientific study."

Her intention, however, was to use the informal study to further more formal ones, and "...to provoke a movement so that policies would be changed."

The 2014 breast milk study wasn't the first time Honeycutt and Moms Across America alleged glyphosate was showing up in food:

There are several memorable quotes in the story that illustrate Monsanto's four-decade long pursuit of questionable toxicology, but one in particular stands out as a true affront to science: "The scientific integrity of a study should not be doubted because of the inability to observe all primary recording of data."

A solution to evaluating glyphosate's safety was proposed in 2016, EHN founder Pete Myers being one of the 14 authors: "force some daylight between regulators and the regulated."

SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
Support good science journalism
From our Newsroom
environmental justice

Op-Ed: Black gold and the color line

How historical racist redlining practices are linked to higher exposures to oil and gas wells.

Words of wisdom from three leaders in the environmental health and justice field

Words of wisdom from three leaders in the environmental health and justice field

A Q&A with Black and Latina researchers about health equity research and career advice for early career scientists.

Our mothers' gifts: Readers respond

Our mothers' gifts: Readers respond

We asked you to share one "big lesson" from your mother. And you responded

Lake Mead

Dykstra: A corpse in a barrel in a drying reservoir

And other climate change tales for our age

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

Gifts from our mothers

Gifts from our mothers

What's one "big gift" your mother gave you? We want your story

Stay informed: sign up for Above the Fold
The most consequential news on your health and the planet: delivered to your inbox every morning. (Weekly roundup also available)