www.theguardian.com

Island of garbage: The all-female voyage to battle Earth's plastic crisis

Ubiquitous plastic waste may pose serious risks to our health. A crew of scientists and activists is conducting a hands-on investigation.


Grist published this story on Feb. 5; if you missed it then, it's worth reading now. The scale of the problem these women are tackling is enormous. A key quote:

"When we sailed into the southern edge of the Gyre, we started to see a piece of plastic over the side of the boat every 10 seconds – a cigarette lighter, a bottle," she said. "Then when you wake up the next morning, and it's still going, and wake up seven days later, and it's still going, and you're 800 miles from the nearest human being – it's that relentlessness that's just so overwhelming."

Keeping track of all this news can also be overwhelming. We employ a team of researchers to filter the deluge and deliver the most relevant, insightful pieces to your inbox – free every week, on Mondays. Subscribe today.

Your engagement is key. After all, as Grist reporter Eve Andrews notes, "the problem will not just drift away."

Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
Credit: Eden, Janine and Jim/flickr
Originals

The I-told-you-so heard ‘round the world

When I'm in the checkout line at the grocery, the tabloids invariably catch my eye for a split second.

Keep reading...
Migrant workers harvest corn on Uesugi Farms in Gilroy, California. (Credit: USDA)
Originals

New country, same oppression: It’s time to bolster farmworkers’ rights

"Why is it that farmworkers feed the nation but they can't get food stamps?"

Keep reading...
Originals

Why I'm dedicated to amplifying neglected voices in environmental health

I am impatient for change. The world's environmental and social problems are growing and spreading like wildfires.

Keep reading...
Youth Climate Strike in Santa Rosa, Calif., in March 2019. (Credit: Fabrice Florin/flickr)
Originals

Together, we make mud

The noted philosopher Rodney Dangerfield described his fictional marriage in a way that provides insight into the widening gulf in U.S. environmental politics: "She's a water sign. I'm an Earth sign. Together, we make mud."

Keep reading...
Originals

Agents of Change: Amplifying neglected voices in environmental health

The face of science is changing.

Keep reading...
From our Newsroom

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.