Journalists, Pittsburgh youth to discuss the future of media in Western PA
Photo by Jaime Lopes on Unsplash

Journalists, Pittsburgh youth to discuss the future of media in Western PA

EHN's Kristina Marusic will help lead the discussion.

Young Pittsburghers, what's the story in your city?


A group of journalists has invited young people from the greater Pittsburgh region to weigh in on the future of the region's media landscape.

The event, which is open to all residents ages 11-25, will be held from 4:30-6:30 PM on Monday, May 6th at SLB Radio Studios, located in the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh. The program is a partnership between Bridge Pittsburgh, a new regional collaborative media initiative, and Youth Express, a program of SLB Radio.

"The youth have an important voice that's often overlooked, and I'm eager to hear their ideas," said Kristina Marusic, EHN's Pittsburgh reporter who is co-coordinating the event on behalf of Bridge Pittsburgh. "The things we learn through this listening session will be incredibly valuable as we decide which topics Pittsburgh news outlets should focus on covering collaboratively."

Attendees will be asked questions like:

  • Where do you turn for news?
  • What topics do you most enjoy reading or watching or listening to news about?
  • What issues that affect young people do you think deserve more media coverage in the Pittsburgh region?
  • How do you think media companies can do a better job of serving young people?
  • What do you wish more journalists knew about young people?
  • If there was going to be one theme that all the media companies in Pittsburgh would start covering together, what do you think it should be?

Youth curious about careers and practices in journalism also will be able to pose questions to seasoned professionals.

Bridge Pittsburgh: Youth Listening Session

Bridge Pittsburgh: Youth Listening Sessionwww.facebook.com

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