nationalpost.com

‘On life support:’ Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds

This is really important science. It demonstrates that neonicotinoid pesticides and chlorpyrifos harm more than insects. They interfere with bird orientation and feeding. And if you think humans are immune to these consequences, well... here is some Kool-Aid.


Key finding from the study: "These results suggest that wild songbirds consuming the equivalent of just four imidacloprid-treated canola seeds or eight chlorpyrifos granules per day over 3 days could suffer impaired condition, migration delays and improper migratory direction, which could lead to increased risk of mortality or lost breeding opportunity."

On a personal note, in 1988 I was beginning research into this issue, and while my efforts never took that hypothesis beyond speculation it led to my work with Theo Colborn and our book, Our Stolen Future.

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