‘On life support:’ Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
nationalpost.com

‘On life support:’ Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds

This is really important science. It demonstrates that neonicotinoid pesticides and chlorpyrifos harm more than insects. They interfere with bird orientation and feeding. And if you think humans are immune to these consequences, well... here is some Kool-Aid.


Key finding from the study: "These results suggest that wild songbirds consuming the equivalent of just four imidacloprid-treated canola seeds or eight chlorpyrifos granules per day over 3 days could suffer impaired condition, migration delays and improper migratory direction, which could lead to increased risk of mortality or lost breeding opportunity."

On a personal note, in 1988 I was beginning research into this issue, and while my efforts never took that hypothesis beyond speculation it led to my work with Theo Colborn and our book, Our Stolen Future.

SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
From our Newsroom

Peter Dykstra: The other destructive Columbus

The role of past Secretaries of the Interior in ravaging the West.

Electronic waste from just this year will outweigh the Great Wall of China

"It's a call on consumers to return their electronics because without that, the alternative is the need to mine the materials, which is a lot more environmentally damaging."

As masses of plaintiffs pursue Roundup cancer compensation, migrant farmworkers are left out

Hampered by fear and deprived of resources, migrant farmworkers are unlikely to come forward and seek restitution.

WATCH: A global fertility crisis

"Reproduction is a basic human right ... to have that taken away from you from causes that are not within your control is what I'm most concerned about."

Ocean plastic pollution

Too much plastic is ending up in the ocean — and making its way back onto our dinner plates.

Understanding poverty and children’s health before natural disasters strike

Preparing for and building back after natural disasters should not be a one-size-fits all approach.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.