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New Jersey sets first binding state limits for perfluorinated chemicals
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New Jersey sets first binding state limits for perfluorinated chemicals

Regulators adopt strictest standards in the nation.

Regulators adopt strictest standards in the nation.


On a night that, according to the New York Times, marked clear limits of Trump's appeal and liabilities, New Jersey became the first state to force water utilities to test for and remove two types of manmade chemicals used in everyday products and industrial processes.

The compounds, known as perfluorinated chemicals, used in plastics production, firefighting foams, nonstick cookware, water-repelling clothing, food wrappers, and more, are also associated with high cholesterol, kidney cancer, liver damage, and thyroid disease. We all have tiny amounts in our bloodstream.

Circle of Blue has the story. And our archives have hundreds of stories about the compound and their impact in our bodies and environment.

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