Top news in Originals

In their congressional careers, both Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris fell within the norm for their respective parties.

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Eating an organic diet rapidly and significantly reduces exposure to glyphosate—the world's most widely-used weed killer, which has been linked to cancer, hormone disruption and other harmful impacts, according to a new study.

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When a seabird is found with a belly full of plastic bags, or a turtle is strangled by six-pack rings, it's easy to see how our trash turns deadly when it enters the oceans.

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Natural habitats across the planet that humans have converted to farms, cities or suburbs are much more likely to harbor wildlife that carry parasites or pathogens such as the novel coronavirus than undisturbed areas, according to a new study.

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Plaintiffs in the U.S. Roundup litigation are starting to learn the details of what Bayer AG's $10 billion settlement of cancer claims actually means for them individually, and some are not liking what they see.

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Take a peek with us over the horizon into the latest research on our environment and health.

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Last Tuesday, we almost had a breakthrough moment on the environment.

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As editor of EHN, I've long sought out reporters who can tell stories of environmental injustice and scientists who can put it into context.

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If there's one constant in American politics during my adult lifetime, it's that the Democrats can take any opportunity, any poll lead, or any safe bet, and completely f*ck it up.

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Four of the fellows who participated in the Agents of Change program this year joined the Collaborative on Health and the Environment to discuss their research, activism, and experiences with publishing their ideas.

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A climate change initiative in the Northeastern U.S. designed to cut greenhouse gas emissions has also greatly reduced harmful air pollution and related impacts to kids' health, such as asthma, preterm births and low birth weights, according to a new study.

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The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic will be felt across the planet for a long time.

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In my childhood, our nation's war with itself was seared into me by the assassinations of John F. Kennedy, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert F. Kennedy.

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In 1977, the new president, Jimmy Carter, thought it might be nice to look ahead at what the global environment might look like at the dawn of the coming millennium.

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Want to hear more from our "Agents of Change?" Here's your chance.

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Researchers have found evidence of ice loss from Wilkes Basin in eastern Antarctica during a climate warming event 400,000 years ago, which suggests that parts of the East Antarctic ice sheet could be lost to modern warming trends—ultimately resulting in an additional 13 feet of sea level rise.

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Scientists have concocted many schemes to save coral reefs from climate change. Assisted migration. Selective breeding. Manipulating the coral microbiome.

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The year 2008 seems like a very long time ago.

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Exposure to minuscule amounts of bisphenol-A can cause a multitude of health problems, including effects on the developing brain, heart, and ovaries, according to a paper published on Thursday that integrates data from several animal studies.

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Living near fracking operations that frequently engage in flaring—the process of burning off excess natural gas—makes expectant parents 50 percent more likely to have a preterm birth, according to a new study.

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For more than 150 years, from the rural South to northern cities, Black people have used farming to build self-determined communities and resist oppressive structures that tear them down.

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An article written by a group of 19 toxicologists has been published verbatim in eight toxicology journals in the last four months.

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Think for a minute how much the world's energy profile has changed in the past decade. Wind and solar have finally begun to shake their slumber. Big Coal is in tatters.

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In early March, the Washington state legislature passed a community solar incentives bill meant to help meet renewable energy goals and increase low-income communities' access to solar technology.

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The vilification of public health officials in the COVID-19 crisis reminds us of their vital role as the crossing guards of science.
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"In 2014, my world changed forever when I learned my family was exposed to contaminated drinking water containing high levels of PFAS. Since then, I haven't stopped worrying about my family's health," says Andrea Amico, a New Hampshire resident and PFAS community advocate turned national activist.

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Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in medicine and medical devices is grossly underestimated, and physicians have an ethical obligation to talk about these exposures with their patients, according to a new study.

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Historians generally place the invention of fracking in a gas field in southwestern Kansas in 1947.

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It's that time of year again—summer is in full swing as we head into the Fourth of July weekend.

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As the nation remains in the grip of the COVID-19 pandemic, a more insidious crisis is taking root as households are unable to pay their energy bills, risking serious health consequences and increasing debt, while federal and state governments fail to adequately protect vulnerable families.

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Education and equity are central to good public health.

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My home state has an epic environmental history. And, believe it or not, it's not all bad.

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Editor's note: This article was originally published at Le Monde and is republished here with permission.

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When it comes to our bodies, we are what we eat—or so the adage goes.

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Despite rampant diet-related disease in the U.S., a new report finds that soft-drink companies—led by corporate giants PepsiCo and CocaCola—are ramping up efforts to promote sugary drinks to the tune of $1 billion per year.

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Editor's note: Kirk Smith, founder of the modern field of indoor air pollution studies, died last week at age 73 after suffering a stroke.

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