Top news in Originals

There is no human behavior more dangerous than the poisoning of groundwater we depend on—which is why trade secret law must be amended to protect these precious resources from contamination by undisclosed chemicals used in oil and gas extraction.

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More people on the planet have access to electricity than ever before, however, the world is on pace to fall short on the goal of affordable and sustainable energy for all by 2030, according to an international report on the state of international energy.

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BETHLEHEM, West Bank—In a garden just off the main drag in Bethlehem, a bright-eyed Palestinian man named Muhammad Saleh talked to a visiting group about a crate full of empty tear gas canisters.

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On April 1, 1969, a garrulous sportswriter released a book about his true passion. A month later, a smiling folksinger launched a refurbished boat – his true passion.

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Editor's note: This is the third story in our series on cancer and air pollution in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

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Plastic is polluting oceans, freshwater lakes and rivers, food and us — but it's also a major contributor to global climate change, warns a new report.

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After three stunning courtroom losses in California, the legal battle over the safety of Monsanto's top-selling Roundup herbicide is headed for the company's hometown, where corporate officials can be forced to appear on the witness stand, and legal precedence shows a history of anti-corporate judgments.

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CLAIRTON, Pennsylvania—Driving into Clairton, just 30 minutes outside of Pittsburgh, you see smoke stacks of the U.S. Steel Coke Works plant rise over the hills as the road weaves up and over them, and you smell a change in the air, even with the windows closed.

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In an administration loaded with thoroughbred climate deniers, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo took a novel approach to say the gobsmackingly dumbest thing about the climate crisis yet.

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Only 37 percent of the world's longest rivers remain unimpeded and free-flowing from their source to where they empty, according to a study published today in Nature.

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As a kid growing up on a Montana wheat and cattle ranch in the 50s and 60s, I was raised farming with chemicals.

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Editor's note: This is the fourth story in our series on cancer and air pollution in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

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As springtime spreads over North America, the airwaves are rotten with lawn and garden ads – hoes from Home Depot, lawn spreaders from Lowe's and all manner of seeds, bedding, plants, topsoil and pesticides.

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Harmful pesticides such as glyphosate, atrazine and neonicotinoids were found in nearly all samples of water from the St. Lawrence River and its tributaries, with many samples containing levels higher than the guideline to protect aquatic life, according to new research.

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In chunky black glasses and a patterned scarf, her dark hair pulled back, Beate Ritz still looks more the sophisticated European than the casual Californian, even after decades in America.

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Editor's note: This story originally appeared in Ensia and is printed here as part of a republishing partnership. Read the original here.

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In 1988, author Mark Hertsgaard penned the book On Bended Knee, a story of a tame Washington press corps that offered little resistance to the charms of President Ronald Reagan.

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PITTSBURGH—For the second year in a row, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, was the only U.S. county outside of California to receive all F's in the American Lung Association's national air quality report card.

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More than 80 percent of all waste from Pennsylvania's oil and gas drilling operations stays inside the state, according to a new study that tracked the disposal locations of liquid and solid waste from these operations over 26 years.

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Two New York City council members introduced legislation today that would ban city agencies from spraying glyphosate-based herbicides and other toxic pesticides in parks and other public spaces.

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I've struggled with getting to sleep my entire life. The only things that ever reliably worked for me were college lectures—up all night in the dorm, then lights out for Comparative Biology 101.

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The European Parliament on Thursday called out the dangers posed by endocrine-disrupting compounds and urged the European Union to take action to safeguard human health and the environment.

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Editor's note: This story is part of an ongoing collaboration between Environmental Health News and PublicSource on PFAS contamination in Pennsylvania and was funded in part through the Bridge Pittsburgh Media Partnership.

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When I was a Scientific Program Administrator at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) I saw a lot of scientists doing strong research on endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).

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A team of seven reporters at Undark news magazine won a $20,000 health journalism prize this week, while EHN.org reporter Kristina Marusic was a runner-up.

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Fracking has been linked to preterm births, high-risk pregnancies, asthma, migraine headaches, fatigue, nasal and sinus symptoms, and skin disorders over the last 10 years, according to a new study.

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The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is the most sweeping environmental law on America's books.

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American's love their land, especially rural Americans. Access to land and property ownership shapes people's identity, economic security, and social mobility, things commonly talked about in discussions of property rights.

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Children who live near major roads are more likely to score poorly on communication tests and experience development delays, according to a new study.

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For a guy who's been fascinated with nature all my life, I've been to a paltry number of national parks. My suitcase has no stickers for Yellowstone, Yosemite, or the Grand Canyon.

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Ask people what's most important to them and there's a good chance they'll say, "Staying healthy—and keeping my family healthy."

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Tensions ran hot Wednesday night during a community meeting about proposed fracking at the site of U.S. Steel's Edgar Thomson Steel mill in Braddock, 10 miles east of downtown Pittsburgh.

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Save for one word, Walter Brooke (1914-1986) had an unremarkable career as a Hollywood bit player, usually as a mid-level military officer fighting Indians or Nazis.

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More than a decade ago, I authored a paper warning that the toxic pollutant lead was damaging the brains of our children and costing each year's cohort of American babies hundreds of billions in lifetime income. Today I am writing because there is mounting evidence that failing to protect our children from air pollution will cost far more.

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Advocates of action on climate change have long been galled by the neglect of the issue in reporting on national politics.

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