Top news in Originals

Tests used by the federal government to determine how much of the chemical bisphenol A is in people's bodies have "dramatically underestimated" our exposure, according to an analysis published today.

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Editor's note: This story is part of an ongoing collaboration between Environmental Health News and PublicSource on PFAS contamination in Pennsylvania.
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The R.E. Burger coal-fired power plant's final day ended, appropriately enough, in a cloud of black smoke and dust.

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This is part 1 of a 4-part investigation of the science surrounding the chemical BPA and the U.S. regulatory push to discredit independent evidence of harm while favoring pro-industry science despite significant shortcomings.

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We all are exposed daily to bisphenol-A (BPA) and other bisphenols – estrogen-like substances added to food can liners, paper receipts and plastic containers.

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NEW ALBANY, Ind. — When Jason Flickner was a kid, he built a dam on the creek behind his grandparents' house causing it to flood a neighbor's basement.

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Environmental Health News has teamed up with six other news organizations to cover what often seems to be the most underappreciated water asset in the country: the Ohio River.

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When school systems, universities and colleges, or local governments choose to install artificial turf fields, they seem all bright, shiny green and clean. How many of those buyers pay attention to the endgame—the disposing of many tons of hazardous waste?

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Hardly a day goes by where we aren't reminded that the Earth's climate is changing and that we are responsible for much if not most of that change.

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My wife and I escaped to a remote cabin a few weeks ago. We already live in the remote North and this took us further off grid, into the Wi-Fi-less woods.

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I am a retired Catholic. The Church hierarchy sometimes trades in the curious institution of special dispensation, the granting of a waiver to allow otherwise frowned-upon conduct. The most famous incident of special dispensation in popular culture took place in The Godfather III.

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Iraqi children living near a U.S. army base have elevated levels of dangerous metals in their bodies and are more likely to suffer from birth defects, according to a new study.

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I live right above the Ohio River, off of a thoroughfare called the Ohio River Boulevard.

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How To: This 360-degree video is interactive. Click and drag your mouse, move your device or drag with your finger to explore the Cheat River views, both above and below the water's surface.

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Every September, tourists flock to historic Marietta, along the banks of the Ohio River, for a celebration that harkens back to the Ohio Valley's early days.

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Over the years, I've visited the Vietnam Veterans Memorial dozens of times. It's hard to believe its striking design – a low, chevron-shaped wall of polished black granite containing the names of 58,000 Americans killed in the war – was once controversial.

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In 1958, researchers from the University of Louisville and the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission gathered at a lock on the Monongahela River for routine collecting, counting and comparing of fish species.

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Harmful chemicals are difficult to understand. So, to pair with our investigation, "Exposed" we present EHN's first comic, "Clouded in Clarity," which focuses on BPA and the controversy around an ongoing, massive study on it.

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This is part 4 of a 4-part investigation of the science surrounding the chemical BPA and the U.S. regulatory push to discredit independent evidence of harm while favoring pro-industry science despite significant shortcomings.

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On November 17, 1934, Blanche and Perry Inhofe of Des Moines, Iowa, delivered a lasting gift to climate denial. James Mountain Inhofe (the imposing middle name is actually his Mom's maiden name) came into the world.

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This is part 3 of a 4-part investigation of the science surrounding the chemical BPA and the U.S. regulatory push to discredit independent evidence of harm while favoring pro-industry science despite significant shortcomings.

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In June 1969, a Time Magazine article garnered national attention when it brought to light the water quality conditions in Ohio: a river had literally caught fire.

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For degawëno:da's, paddling the length of the Allegheny River over the course of four months this year was to be a "witness to the raw element of the natural world."

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This is part 2 of a 4-part investigation of the science surrounding the chemical BPA and the U.S. regulatory push to discredit independent evidence of harm while favoring pro-industry science despite significant shortcomings.

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On Wednesday, November 20, EHN's Pittsburgh reporter Kristina Marusic will speak at an event aimed at helping journalists appropriately cover the LGBTQ+ community in Pittsburgh and beyond.

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Research for this article was made possible with the support of the Heinrich Boell Foundation's Transatlantic Media Fellowships. This story was produced and published in collaboration with EHN, Southerly, and Scalawag.

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Editor's note: This story was originally published by PublicSource and is part of an ongoing collaboration between Environmental Health News and PublicSource on PFAS contamination in Pennsylvania.

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Among liberals and environmentalists, the name "Koch Brothers" has become a synonym for the bankrolling of the purge of sound climate science and environmental policy in our government.

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We lost a reader yesterday. And I am more than fine with that.

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PITTSBURGH—Do you smell that?

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News for the United Nations just gets worse.

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Recent estimates in the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study show that the combination of air pollution, poor water sanitation and exposure to lead and radon is responsible for 9 million premature deaths each year.

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If Robert Eugene Murray wasn't born to be America's biggest, baddest coal baron, he'd be a Hollywood scriptwriter's over-the-top vision of one.

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Installing more wind turbines in the Upper Midwest, and more solar panels in the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions, would bring the largest health gains and benefits from U.S. renewable energy, according to a new Harvard University analysis.

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One pill in particular—a pill so iconic in American life that it is simply called "The Pill"—contributes, in the aggregate, to a significant amount of hormones in wastewater and, potentially, in drinking water.

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PITTSBURGH—On Wednesday afternoon, President Donald Trump spoke in support of fracking at the Shale Insight Convention here, where he praised the industry for creating jobs and giving America "energy independence."

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