Top news in Originals

The music video for Thomas Dolby's quirky, synthesizer-driven 1980's hit featured a possibly deranged codger in a lab coat waving an index finger and rhythmically shouting "SCIENCE!"

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COVID-19 has turned the world upside down and remains widespread.

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A new study has uncovered a link between fracking chemicals in farm water and a rare birth defect in horses—which researchers say could serve as a warning about fracking and human infant health.

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For more than 150 years, from the rural South to northern cities, Black people have used farming to build self-determined communities and resist oppressive structures that tear them down.

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In the 1960s, researchers from the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory began testing a new class of firefighting foam that could rapidly extinguish fuel fires.

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Take a peek with us over the horizon into the latest research on our environment and health.

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Even in the best of times, spring's long days, warming temperatures, greening landscapes, and sunshine represent a time of growth and optimism—a time to open windows, go outdoors, perhaps even try one's hand at gardening or fishing.

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Let's visit a city of 600,000 that, until a few days ago, I didn't know existed.

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The great writer Alice Walker has said, "I get energy from the Earth itself. I get optimism from the Earth itself. I feel that as long as the Earth can make a spring every year, I can. As long as the Earth can flower and produce nurturing fruit, I can, because I am the Earth."

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This investigation is a cross-border collaboration between The Narwhal and Environmental Health News.

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The country's primary government agency in charge of protecting human health and the environment is choosing NOT to regulate a chemical called perchlorate in drinking water.

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Last year was quite the year for 50th anniversaries.

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"From Black woman to Black woman, is it a good idea for me to participate in these studies?"

I was not expecting this call or question. We had met a few days earlier when I recruited her for a reproductive health study.

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With unemployment approaching Great Depression levels, the nation is waving the white flag on controlling the coronavirus.

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We all have questions about the novel coronavirus sweeping through our neighborhoods – and across the globe.

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On April 26, our President suggested that reporters who earned "Noble" (sic) Prizes for reporting on "the Russian hoax" return their awards. The President should have caught his own misspelling, since he'd be a perennial contender for the Nobel Prize in Twitterature, if it weren't a Fake Award.

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With the outbreak of COVID-19, our society is reeling. Sadly, the uncertainty, displacement and fear you may now feel has been the common, everyday experience for many Native American people for a long time.

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Disasters are not natural. We—humanity and society—create them and we can choose to prevent them.

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PITTSBURGH—Allegheny County, which encompasses Pittsburgh, is among the 10 percent of U.S. counties that have both high relative density of major air pollution sources and high relative rates of COVID-19 deaths, according to a new report.

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Make no mistake, Americans didn't invent this form of persecution. If you don't believe me, ask Galileo.

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The COVID-19 crisis has revealed the harmful consequences of leaders making critical decisions based on insufficient data, which end up hurting the most vulnerable communities.

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Water, water everywhere and hardly a drop is being protected by the Trump Administration.

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Each story is heartbreaking.

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What affects how likely you are to die from the novel coronavirus?

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Methane emissions are vastly undercounted at the state and national level because we're missing accidental leaks from oil and gas wells, according to a new study.

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Suppose they gave an Earth Day and nobody came?

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Across the country, many people who've never stepped into a soybean or corn field are familiar with pesticides like the cancer-linked glyphosate in Roundup and drift-prone dicamba.

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Endocrine-disrupting chemicals masquerade as hormones. These insidious contaminants increase the diseases that cause the underlying conditions that result in susceptibility to COVID-19.

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Denis Hayes was a 25-year-old student at Harvard Kennedy School in 1969 but dropped out after a semester to become a principal organizer of a grass-roots nonprofit that planned a nationwide rally on April 22, 1970, an event they would call Earth Day.

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Since 2018, I can often be found at our local community center—listening, learning, sharing, and strategizing around the table with community members on ways to push the city for more affordable housing and prevent the displacement of neighborhood residents.

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Most people living in the U.S. are suffering from one or more chronic diseases that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified as putting people at increased risk of dying from COVID-19.

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I've been writing about the environment for years, but here are three presidents I don't think I've ever mentioned: James Monroe, Chester Alan Arthur, and William McKinley.

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BPA - a common chemical in durable plastics - is detrimental to our health and remains in widespread use.

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Asthma attacks decreased significantly among residents near coal-fired power plants after the plants shut down or upgraded their emission controls, according to a new study.

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PITTSBURGH—Environmental groups are calling on the local health department to seek federal funding for additional monitoring of benzene, a cancer-causing chemical, near one of the region's most notorious sources of air pollution.

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Reverend Mitchell Hescox was on Capitol Hill in February, urging members of the House Oversight and Reform Committee not to gut an air pollution rule that protects children from the brain-damaging chemical mercury.

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