Top news in Originals

PITTSBURGH—Residents from eight communities surrounding the Clairton Coke Works gathered alongside environmental advocates in Clairton on Wednesday to share their concerns about the health impacts of a recent influx in air pollution resulting from an accident at the plant nearly a month ago.

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Lewis Raven Wallace visits displaced residents in New Bern, North Carolina, who are still struggling for housing and health in the wake of last year's Hurricane Florence.

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Editor's note: This story is part of a series examining the social and health injustices resulting from increasingly intense storms and is the result of a collaboration between EHN and Scalawag Magazine, an independent nonprofit magazine that covers the American South.

Read part 1 here.

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Editor's note: This story is part of a series examining the social and health injustices resulting from increasingly intense storms and is the result of a collaboration between EHN and Scalawag Magazine, an independent nonprofit magazine that covers the American South.

Keep reading... Show less

Hurricane Florence ravaged North Carolina last fall. While cleanup continues and residents pick up the pieces of their life, many people in New Bern, a small community along the Neuse River in the eastern part of the state, have nothing to pick up. Homes have been destroyed and won't be rebuilt. Lives have been upended.

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Sean Hannity speaks to millions daily, including one pliant president, via Fox News and his syndicated radio show. Guesses at his annual income start at about $30 million.

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The way we eat and grow food has to dramatically change if we're going to feed the world's increasing population by 2050 and protect the planet, according to a major report released today from the EAT-Lancet Commission.

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DETROIT—Theresa Landrum still has an emergency kit the Wayne County Department of Homeland Security gave her years ago when she asked the agency to help her community, which is surrounded by heavy industry, create an evacuation plan in the event of a chemical emergency.

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A little more than a month ahead of a first-ever federal trial over the issue of whether or not Monsanto's popular weed killers can cause cancer, a new analysis raises troubling questions about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) handling of pertinent science on glyphosate safety.

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The rise of desalination plants, now almost 16,000 worldwide, has led to a glut of brine waste—much of which is dumped into oceans, which can raise salinity to dangerous levels and put toxic chemicals in the marine environment threatening ocean life, according to a new study.

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PITTSBURGH—Three weeks after a Christmas Eve fire at U.S. Steel's Clairton Coke Works plant resulted in levels of sulfur dioxide in the air that exceed Clean Air Act standards for safety, a local physician has observed an increase in asthma exacerbations among elementary school students who live near the plant.

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PITTSBURGH—On January 9, residents of 22 Pittsburgh-area neighborhoods were advised by their county health department to minimize outdoor activity because of high levels of sulfur dioxide pollution in the air.

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Charismatic megafauna is the mouthful of a phrase used to describe the big lovable beasts the world wants to save – or at least cast as stars of our cartoons.

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Editor's note: This story originally appeared in Ensia and is printed here as part of a republishing partnership. Read the original here.

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A purported "eco-friendly" flame retardant breaks down into smaller, possibly harmful chemicals when exposed to heat and ultraviolet light, according to a study from German researchers.

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Environmental Health News— a nonprofit, nonpartisan news service dedicated to driving science into public discussion and policy on environmental health issues—is looking for an intern interested in research, storytelling, community and change to join our Pittsburgh bureau.

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Even as Greenland melts, glaciers recede and Kilimanjaro sheds its equatorial snow, hell froze over in a corner of the media world last week.

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As reporters, we're used to asking questions.

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PITTSBURGH — Around one in three Americans gets a cancer diagnosis during their lifetime. Almost everyone knows at least one person who's been touched by the disease. In Pittsburgh, most people know more than one.

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PITTSBURGH—My family's ties to Pittsburgh run deep.

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It was 1957. I was born. Elizabeth had been queen for four years. Elvis had been king for one, give or take.

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The year saw President Donald Trump's promised multi-front assault on environmental values, regulations and science bear some toxic fruit.

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Editor's note: Environmental Health Sciences is proud to be a media partner with the National Council for Science and the Environment and will be at their annual conference Jan. 8-10.

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Like many Americans, I sat slackjawed this week as the two most powerful Democrats in the nation hectored the President as if they were both 12-year-olds. And the President, off on a tear about who would pay for his border wall, behaved like a 9-year-old.

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This is the story of how our physical environments in every community are currently under siege from endocrine-disrupting chemicals in our midst.

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Weed killers in wheat crackers and cereals, insecticides in apple juice and a mix of multiple pesticides in spinach, string beans and other veggies – all are part of the daily diets of many Americans. For decades, federal officials have declared tiny traces of these contaminants to be safe. But a new wave of scientific scrutiny is challenging those assertions.

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KING COUNTY, Wash. — When perchloroethylene (PERC) was introduced to the dry cleaning industry in the 1930s, it must have seemed like a miracle solvent.

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People who live near oil and gas operations are more likely to have early indicators of cardiovascular disease than those who don't, according to a recent study.

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In response to climate change, cities are cultivating the capacity of their inhabitants and core systems to adapt successfully to the future's new requirements.

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Editor's note: This is adapted from a lecture Zoeller gave at the 51st Session of International Seminars on Planetary Emergencies: Science for Peace the World Over, in Erice, Italy, in August. It has been lightly edited.

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Two news items this week illustrate the sometimes-maddening struggle for environmental progress.

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The fastest driving route to Sacramento from Los Angeles is the I-5 or Highway 99. On the way there, you'll drive through miles of farms, oil fields and open space.

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Editor's note: This is part two of a two-part series on a recent bribery trial over a toxic Superfund site in Birmingham, Alabama. Read part one here.

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Let's start with a multiple choice: If we were to turn the clock back 30 years, which of these two things did you think would happen, and which two did you think would not?

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Editor's note: This story is part of an ongoing collaboration between Environmental Health News and PublicSource on PFAS contamination in Pennsylvania.

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Researchers who examined Dow Chemical Company-sponsored animal tests performed two decades ago on the insecticide chlorpyrifos found inaccuracies in what the company reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency compared to what the data showed.

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