Top news in Originals

This is the story of how our physical environments in every community are currently under siege from endocrine-disrupting chemicals in our midst.

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KING COUNTY, Wash. — When perchloroethylene (PERC) was introduced to the dry cleaning industry in the 1930s, it must have seemed like a miracle solvent.

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People who live near oil and gas operations are more likely to have early indicators of cardiovascular disease than those who don't, according to a recent study.

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In response to climate change, cities are cultivating the capacity of their inhabitants and core systems to adapt successfully to the future's new requirements.

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Weed killers in wheat crackers and cereals, insecticides in apple juice and a mix of multiple pesticides in spinach, string beans and other veggies – all are part of the daily diets of many Americans. For decades, federal officials have declared tiny traces of these contaminants to be safe. But a new wave of scientific scrutiny is challenging those assertions.

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Editor's note: This is adapted from a lecture Zoeller gave at the 51st Session of International Seminars on Planetary Emergencies: Science for Peace the World Over, in Erice, Italy, in August. It has been lightly edited.

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Two news items this week illustrate the sometimes-maddening struggle for environmental progress.

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The fastest driving route to Sacramento from Los Angeles is the I-5 or Highway 99. On the way there, you'll drive through miles of farms, oil fields and open space.

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Editor's note: This is part two of a two-part series on a recent bribery trial over a toxic Superfund site in Birmingham, Alabama. Read part one here.

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Let's start with a multiple choice: If we were to turn the clock back 30 years, which of these two things did you think would happen, and which two did you think would not?

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Editor's note: This story is part of an ongoing collaboration between Environmental Health News and PublicSource on PFAS contamination in Pennsylvania.

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Researchers who examined Dow Chemical Company-sponsored animal tests performed two decades ago on the insecticide chlorpyrifos found inaccuracies in what the company reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency compared to what the data showed.

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Editor's note: This is part one of a two-part series on a recent bribery trial over a toxic Superfund site in Birmingham, Alabama. Read part two here.

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This Tuesday, the 27th, is designated as Giving Tuesday. It's the day when we're encouraged, exhorted, and maybe a little guilt-tripped to support all manner of worthy causes.

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At the end of September, the House and Senate missed their deadline to agree on a Farm Bill, leaving in limbo the $100 billion worth of programs we spend annually on food assistance and agriculture.

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Six years ago, I worked at the Illinois Natural History Survey testing roadkill otter carcasses for contaminants that build up in the bodies of animals that eat fish.

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Here's a turkey recipe I can't recommend. Plastic alert. Very bad idea.

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When news – particularly bad news – comes at you through a firehose, it's human nature that this week's headline horrors wash away last week's horrors.

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For centuries, the Arctic has been a relatively safe place for shorebirds such as plovers and sandpipers to lay their eggs, as nests in the tropics were much more likely to suffer attacks from predators.

That is changing.

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Insects near streams are taking in loads of pharmaceutical drugs and can pass the compounds on to predators higher in the food chain, such as frogs, birds and bats, according to a new study.

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Every 45 minutes or so on Election Day, I was treated to the televised strains of "Come Fly With Me," a 1957 crooners' standard made famous by Frank Sinatra.

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EHN editor Brian Bienkowski joined Living on Earth's Steve Curwood to talk about three new studies released last month linking fluoride exposure to ADHD in children and thyroid problems in adults.

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Last month, three pieces of news hit us, and our environment, upside the head.

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More than 1.7 million Americans will be newly diagnosed with cancer in 2018, and 35 percent of these cases will prove fatal.

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The American government's plunge into the environmental Dark Ages wasn't the work of one bloviating fellow. It didn't spring fully formed on Election Day 2016.

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In making our most recent film, The Devil We Know, we thought we understood the pervasive and insidious role that toxic chemicals play in our collective lives.

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Editor's note: This is a follow-up to yesterday's story, Fracking conference and opposing tribal rally highlight competing visions for Western Pennsylvania's future, which offers an in-depth explanation of the issues discussed below.

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PITTSBURGH—Air pollution is to blame for up to 33 million emergency room visits for asthma attacks around the world annually, according to a new study.

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Glyphosate— the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup weedkiller—was found in all 28 samples of different cereals, oatmeal and snack bars tested by a lab for Environmental Working Group, according to a report released today.

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PITTSBURGH—As acting EPA administrator Andrew Wheeler and natural gas industry representatives descend on Pittsburgh for the annual Shale Insight Convention this week, tribal leaders are rallying against the continued expansion of fracking operations and a proposed ethane cracker that would reshape the local economy and landscape.

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Wolverine range in the U.S. has declined substantially.

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Dow AgroSciences has applied for a large expansion of sulfoxaflor, a pesticide shown to harm bees, according to a federal notice last week.

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Two studies — one from Canada and one Mexico — released today point to potential health problems from fluoride, which, in a majority of U.S. communities, is purposefully added to drinking water to protect people's teeth.

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As the Florida Panhandle begins to recover from Hurricane Michael, the state's attention will turn to a big Senate race next month. Hurricane Michael may cast the deciding vote.

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Love science? Whatever you do, don't read the comment string on the Portland Press Herald's "Pearl Harbor" editorial.

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Vox's hilarious story about the ridiculous length of CVS receipts – the height of a small child? the length of a sofa? – failed to mention one of the more pressing concerns about being handed a ream of thermal-sensitive paper upon checkout: Exposure to bisphenol-A, or BPA.

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