Top news in Population

Trees continue to be cut down as Seattle's population expands, which was the fastest-growing big city in America over the last decade.

Record-breaking rains this week in the country’s southernmost main island, which have killed 62, have shown the vulnerability of people living in nursing homes.
The U.S. hasn’t had a formal definition for what constitutes a suburb. A new data analysis comes closer to defining America’s most popular neighborhood type. 

Climate shocks and changing weather mean that farmers' incomes are leading to a marriage crisis along coastal regions of southern India.

Extreme weather and rising seas are increasing the burden of work, ill-health and violence faced by women who are forced to leave home or left behind as menfolk seek jobs elsewhere.

The pandemic has revealed deep flaws in the world’s food system and food leaders are calling for global coordination and climate resilient agriculture.
Forget open fields -- this farm uses LED lights, robots and AI to change the taste of your food.

The number of "zoonotic" epidemics is rising, with the root cause being the destruction of nature by humans and the growing demand for meat, according to the authors of a UN report.

A quarter-billion years ago, huge volcanic eruptions burned coal, leading to the worst extinction in Earth’s history. Here’s how scientists hunted down the evidence.

The affluent citizens of the world are responsible for most environmental impacts and are central to any future prospect of retreating to safer environmental conditions.

The study for this year's Human Reproduction keynote lecture found a link between phthalates and other endocrine disrupting chemicals in body-care products and the timing of puberty in girls.

In this episode, we lament how the United Nations avoids the subject of overpopulation in its World Population Day messaging.

The world-renowned conservationist desperately wants the world to pay attention to what she sees as the greatest threat to humanity's existence.

The Chinese government is taking draconian measures to slash birth rates among Uighurs and other minorities as part of a sweeping campaign to curb its Muslim population, even as it encourages some of the country's Han majority to have more children.

The facts are clear: the wealthiest 0.54%, about 40 million people, are responsible for 14% of lifestyle-related greenhouse gas emissions, while the bottom 50% of income earners, almost 4 billion people, only emit around 10%.

An Alaskan volcano once spurred climate change, darkening Mediterranean skies, launching a famine and possibly changing history.

As more people push into once-remote areas, truly quiet spots have become increasingly scarce. Now, a coalition of activists, scientists, and park officials are trying to preserve the last quiet places on the planet.

As the coronavirus spreads, it has reached the western Amazon's Javari Valley, home to the world's remaining uncontacted indigenous groups.

A new study looks at whether Puerto Rico's rebuilding efforts are targeting the right population.

Educating citizens about the ecological predicament of a global population that has more than doubled since the 1960s is an essential exercise.

A group of scientists argue that the Covid lockdown, what they’re calling the “anthropause,” is an unprecedented opportunity to study how humans affect animal behavior.

Geologists have linked one of the planet's most devastating events to the burning of fossil fuels, as ancient coal fires set in train a global extinction wave.

The Sierra Club announced it has joined the Center for Biological Diversity and a number of other conservation groups in two lawsuits to protect the San Pedro River, one of the last undammed rivers in the Southwest.

Education and equity are central to good public health.

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In South Asia, days with both extreme heat and extreme pollution are expected to increase 175% by 2050. Separately, the health effects are bad; together they will likely be worse.
Contrary to the argument made in Jeff Gibbs' and Michael Moore's controversial film, curbing growth can slow climate change, but only clean technologies can stop it.

When it comes to our bodies, we are what we eat—or so the adage goes.

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Urban density in and of itself doesn't contribute to the spread COVID-19, according to a recent Johns Hopkins' study, and the illness's spread in Maryland mirrors those findings.

Climate change promises to disrupt a variety of natural systems across the globe, but new research suggests human activities pose a more immediate threat to the planet's largest river systems.
Beloved by Silicon Valley tycoons and tyranny-fearing libertarians, are cities atop the waves Earth’s next frontier?