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Preventing a dark future: Zhenyu Tian, Ph.D.

Preventing a dark future: Zhenyu Tian, Ph.D.

"Environmental pollution is sometimes recognized as a smaller issue...but serious consequences could happen if we don't take serious actions."

When you think of our planet's future, do you imagine a dystopian reality? Dr. Tian hopes his work will help to avoid that.


In this video, Dr. Tian provides a compelling overview of why he studies environmental pollution from an unexpected perspective: science fiction.

Zhenyu Tian, Ph.D., Assistant Professor at Northeastern University

Dr. Zhenyu Tian is an environmental chemist curious about organic pollutants in the environment. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, where he studied the transformation products and co-occurring pollutants of PAHs in contaminated soil. Then he worked as a postdoctoral research scientist at the Center for Urban Waters at the University of Washington Tacoma, applying non-target screening to identify emerging contaminants in water and biota and to evaluate engineered treatment systems. He currently works as an assistant professor at Northeastern University.

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Find Dr. Tien on Twitter @tttonytian

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