www.nytimes.com

In parched Southwest, warm spring renews threat of ‘megadrought’

Rapid melting this year showed that good snowpack doesn’t necessarily translate into full reservoirs.
Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
www.nytimes.com
Climate

In parched Southwest, warm spring renews threat of ‘megadrought’

The Southwest has been mired in drought for most of the past two decades. The heat and dryness, made worse by climate change, have been so persistent that some researchers say the region is now caught up in a megadrought

www.nytimes.com
Climate

New York City had among least snowy winters on record

There was almost no snow at all in February, leaving children crestfallen but commuters relieved.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Japan’s enchanting ice monsters, claimed by climate change

The Japanese call them “juhyo," or ice monsters, and armies of these abominable snowmen once spread across the country's northern mountains.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

Porter Fox: Why can’t rich people save winter?

Ski season is shrinking. Yet the people who love the sport aren’t doing enough to stop climate change.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

This Olympic skier wants to save the world’s snow

Jessie Diggins is a cross-country skier on the American women's team and a favorite to win a medal at the Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea. She's also an advocate for climate action.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

Iranians prayed for rain, but were covered in snow

A full-blown water crisis is drying out Iran, much to the concern of officials who fear protests and strife if conditions do not improve.

Keep reading... Show less
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Iranians prayed for rain, but were covered in snow

The country has been gripped by a terrible drought, so a blizzard brought joy — although the relief was most likely only temporary.
From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.