U.S. intel chief warns of devastating cyber threat to U.S. infrastructure.

How are cyber security and environmental health linked? Just look at the health mess – still! – in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria leveled the grid.

While at first glance this story would appear unrelated to environmental health, it actually covers a story of vital importance to the environment, health, and environmental health.


Cybersecurity attacks could take down parts or all of the utility grid, or other important components of a country's infrastructure, including in the United States. A few days without grid would be tolerable, but some plausible scenarios involve weeks or months—or longer—down times. Check out Ted Koppel's book "Lights Out."

For an additional perspective, read Nick Kristof's New York Times essay on 4 July: "To hackers, we're Bambi in the woods." Or dig into David Sanger's new, superb book, "The Perfect Weapon."

A few weeks without a functioning grid would be devastating. Consider what the Hurricane Maria did to health, water supply, food security and more on Puerto Rico.

From the Reuters story:

Russia, China, Iran and North Korea are launching daily cyber strikes on the computer networks of federal, state and local government agencies, U.S. corporations, and academic institutions, said Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats.

Of the four, "Russia has been the most aggressive foreign actor, no question," he said.

Read the full Reuters story here.

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