time.com

Weed killer Roundup is increasingly showing up in people

The latest study to look at the long-term effects of Roundup raises new questions


The research, published in JAMA, adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that we should be concerned as glyphosate – the key ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup – lingers in our blood, liver, fat cells and urine.

  • The number of people over age 50 testing positive for glyphosate shot up 500 percent between 1993 and 2016.
  • The amount of glyphosate in their bodies jumped 1,208 percent over that period.

What does this mean for our health? Here research falls short, but studies in rats suggest persistent low-level exposure to the herbicide leads to liver cancer.

Also worth noting: On Tuesday the European Parliament voted to ban glyphosate by 2022. Deutsche Welle has that story here.

And check out our collection of top news on toxics, curated by our journalists & researchers.

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