We're hiring! Looking for a Pittsburgh-based environmental health reporter

We want enterprising, creative reporting on the winners and losers of environmental decisions in Western Pennsylvania – and to show how those decisions ripple out across the country.

We're looking to shine a light on the environmental health challenges and opportunities confronting residents of Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania. If you're capable of writing fearless stories that draw a local and national audience, we want to hear from you.


These stories, while relevant to all residents, should note the disproportionate environmental justice impacts that often fall on communities of color and poor neighborhoods.

Here's what we're looking for:

The reporter must actively engage with local scientists, analysts and evidence-based resources to inform data-driven reporting. That reporting will have a focus developed in collaboration with EHN's senior editor and executive director. It must draw local readers and a national audience.

We're looking for impact and change. Your job is to do enterprising, creative reporting on the winners and losers of environmental decisions in the region and show how those decisions ripple out across the country. We expect you to hold powerful people accountable and expose real-life consequences of policy decisions.

Who we're looking for:

  • A track record of aggressive, investigative reporting that digs into those pulling the levers of power.
  • Experience reporting on the environment or social justice is a plus, but we're really interested in hearing fresh ideas on how to cover this beat.
  • Hunger to have an impact and change lives.
  • Fresh ideas on reaching and building an audience for your work.
  • An ability to work well with others. We're a small but tight group.
  • The unexpected. We don't have all the answers, and if you got some ideas but don't fit the description above, sell us on them.

If this sounds exciting, here's what we need from you:

Send your résumé and a one-page letter explaining why you'd be a good fit. We want your best clips, even if they're not about the region or the environment. And we would like a short memo describing how you would approach the environmental health beat in Western Pennsylvania: What stories might you cover? How would you report them? How would you achieve and measure impact? We have some stories we want you to tell, but we want to hear your ideas.

Send your packet via email to Douglas Fischer, executive director, Environmental Health Sciences, at dfischer@ehsciences.org. We we start screening applications on Jan. 26, but the search remains open until the position is filled.

The job is full time and includes benefits. The job is based in Pittsburgh or western Pennsylvania. If you're not in the region but willing to move, we're happy to talk.

About Environmental Health News:

EHN.org is an independent, nonprofit news outlet published by Environmental Health Sciences. We're a virtual workplace with offices in Bozeman, Mont., and Charlottesville, Va., and key staff in Virginia, Michigan and Georgia.

We are dedicated to pushing good science and reporting into public policy and public discussion. We are committed to diversity and to building an inclusive environment for people of all backgrounds and ages. We especially encourage members of underrepresented communities to apply, including women, people of color, LGBTQ people and people with disabilities.

For more about EHN, see our "about us page"

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