Top news in Children

Top Democrats are pushing the FDA to regulate toxic metals in baby food after a congressional investigation discovered the presence of metals like arsenic, lead and cadmium at levels far higher than those allowed in bottled water and other products.

This is part 4 of our 4-part series, "Fractured," an investigation of fracking chemicals in the air, water, and people of western Pennsylvania.

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State lawmakers across the country are trying to amend their constitutions to guarantee residents the right to a healthy environment. It could propel a flurry of legal cases against Big Oil.
Legal experts say that environmental laws must be more strongly enforced by the government to protect the health and safety of Texans.
After pressure from families, Pennsylvania has launched studies into whether fracking can be linked to local illnesses.

Officials are giving residents of some long-suffering New Jersey communities tools to push back against polluters.

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Data provided to CBS News by 28 states shows births dropped by about 7.2% in December 2020, nine months after COVID-19 was declared a pandemic.
The effects of air pollution on children appear to be more dangerous than realized. A new study shows how pollutants like wildfire smoke and car exhaust can affect heart development in children, posing risks later in life.
Seven attorneys who represent Flint residents in water crisis lawsuits against the state of Michigan, city of Flint and others are asking a U.S. District Court judge to suspend the use of portable bone scanning equipment as part of a $641-million proposed settlement that has received preliminary approval in federal and state courts.
For more than 30 years, a small city nestled in the mountains of British Columbia’s West Kootenay region has been working to clean up lead pollution that spewed from the local smelter for almost a century.

A landmark class action against the Australian government could set a precedent that would stop the government from approving new fossil fuel projects because of their contribution to climate change.

Extreme weather patterns and flooding worsened by climate change are adversely affecting the health of babies born in the Amazon rainforest.

The potential health risks of chemicals used in plastic toys have had scientists concerned for years, but new research reveals just how widespread the risk of harm to children remains.

It's been 12 years since fracking reshaped the American energy landscape and much of the Pennsylvania countryside.

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This is part 1 of our 4-part series, "Fractured," an investigation of fracking chemicals in the air, water, and people of western Pennsylvania.

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Some economists say a shrinking workforce threatens China's chances of overtaking the U.S. as the world's largest economy. China's workforce is expected to shrink by more than 0.5% a year, as fewer young people replace a growing number of retirees.

Lead, arsenic and cadmium are commonly found in baby foods, but also in many of the ingredients families use to make their own.

During the black summer bushfires Sonya gave birth six weeks early. Afterwards, when her doctor told her that bushfire smoke may have had something to do with it, she was shocked – she had not been warned that this was possible.

This is part 2 of our 4-part series, "Fractured," an investigation of fracking chemicals in the air, water, and people of western Pennsylvania.

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A simulation of airflow in a real New York City classroom shows how simple ventilation and filtration can reduce the probability of coronavirus exposure.

This is part 3 of our 4-part series, "Fractured," an investigation of fracking chemicals in the air, water, and people of western Pennsylvania.

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Environmental Health News reporter Kristina Marusic gives the story behind "Fractured," an investigation of fracking pollution in western Pennsylvania.

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Over the course of two years, EHN enlisted the help of scientific advisors to develop a study protocol, obtain approval from an Independent Review Board, ensure that we used proper collection protocol, and analyze and interpret the data for a scientific study on human exposure to chemicals associated with unconventional oil and gas operations in Pennsylvania.

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An invisible line splits the rural road of Avenue 416 in California's Tulare county, at the point where the nut trees stretch east toward the towering Sierra Nevada mountains in the distance. On one side of the line, residents have clean water. On the other side, they do not.

During the pandemic, there was a dramatic increase in exposures to hand sanitizer reported among kids under 6, U.S. poison center data shows.

14-year-old Anna Hursey is still in shock after receiving a message from the U.S. Embassy to help in President Joe Biden's mission to tackle climate change.

Your hormones have been hijacked.

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On fertility, we are running out of time.

And the growing number of plastics in our lives are accelerating the crunch.

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Are mattresses toxic? And does that matter?

Hundreds of electric school buses are about to hit the roads in Montgomery County in an effort to cut tailpipe emissions that warm the planet and can affect student health.

A decision by the Green mayor of Lyon, seen by many as the country's culinary capital, to temporarily take meat off the menu in school canteens during the coronavirus pandemic has sparked a major political row in France.

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