Survey suggests climate change has reduced presence of invasive Argentine ants

A nearly 30-year survey, conducted at Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, has found that the distribution of Argentine ants has shrunk as a result of climate change. Meanwhile, native species are faring better.

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Climate

How the 1% are preparing for the apocalypse.

Say "doomsday bunker" and most people would imagine a concrete room filled with cots and canned goods.

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Climate

Worrying new research finds that the ocean is cutting through a key Antarctic ice shelf.

A new scientific study published Tuesday has found that warm ocean water is carving an enormous channel into the underside of one of the key floating ice shelves of West Antarctica, the most vulnerable sector of the enormous ice continent.

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Frits Ahlefeldt FritsAhlefeldt.com
Climate

Industry seeks legal cover with replacement rule.

As the Trump administration mulls whether to replace the Obama-era Clean Power Plan, its legal foes are already plotting creative courtroom challenges against U.S. EPA and directly against utilities.

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Climate

Beyond biodiversity: A new way of looking at how species interconnect.

In 1966, an ecologist at the University of Washington named Robert Paine removed all the ochre starfish from a short stretch of Pacific shoreline on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. The absence of the predator had a dramatic effect on its ecosystem. In less than a year, a diverse tidal environment collapsed into a monoculture of mussels because the starfish was no longer around to eat them.

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Climate

Fall armyworm arrives in Africa on the heels of climate change.

Tobias Okwara is a farmer in Kayoro Parish in southeastern Uganda. In the midst of a long drought that began in May 2016, he and his neighbors got together to discuss what to do. Food was becoming scarce, and they hoped to recover quickly once the rains started again. They decided they would pool their meagre resources and plant a large communal field of maize. By spring 2017, the rains had finally returned, and their maize was thriving.

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Climate

Why Southern Nevada is fighting to build a 250-mile water pipeline.

Why Southern Nevada Is Fighting to Build a 250-Mile Water Pipeline

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Climate

Another victim of Hurricane Maria: Puerto Rico's treasured rainforest.

Another Victim of Hurricane Maria: Puerto Rico’s Treasured Rainforest

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Little owl sparks a large ESA flap.

The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owls that inhabit Arizona are sticking the Fish and Wildlife Service with a pretty big problem.

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Island Press
Originals

Weed killer for breakfast.

For many people, a toasted bagel topped with honey might sound like a healthy breakfast choice. Others might prefer a bowl of oatmeal or cornflakes or a hot plate of scrambled eggs. Few would likely welcome a dose of weed killer that has been linked to cancer in their morning meal.

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Toxics

Peregrine falcons slow to return to Appalachia.

Able to dive after avian prey at a shrieking 200 miles per hour, the peregrine falcon is the fastest animal on Earth. Yet the return of the peregrine to its historic habitat in the western Chesapeake region has been anything but speedy.

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Climate

Texas company seeks to renew permit to look for Big Cypress oil.

By Eric Staats, eric.staats@naplesnews.com; 239-263-4780

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From our Newsroom

Researchers, doctors call for regulators to reassess safety of taking acetaminophen during pregnancy

The painkiller, taken by half of pregnant women worldwide, could be contributing to rising rates of reproductive system problems and neurodevelopmental disorders like ADHD and autism.

LISTEN: Azmal Hossan on the sociology of climate crises in South Asia

"If we look at the rate of carbon emissions, most is emitted by the developed and industrialized countries, but the problem is poor countries like Bangladesh are the main sufferers."

Op-ed: We don’t have time for another fossil fuel bridge

Those holding up carbon capture and hydrogen as new climate solutions are leading us down the wrong path.

Climate storytelling: Creativity and imagination in the face of bleak realities

Working with youth writers on a climate-fiction screenplay has opened my eyes to the power of the arts in confronting environmental crises.

Ocean plastic pollution

Too much plastic is ending up in the ocean — and making its way back onto our dinner plates.

Peter Dykstra: Protected by an alphabet soup of acronyms

CITES, CCAMLR, LDC, MBTA, CBD, Ramsar, LWCF ... they may make your eyes glaze over, but they protect our health and planet.

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