www.theguardian.com

Soap dodger: Meet the doctor who says we have been showering wrong

Hand-washing aside, James Hamblin has not used soap for five years. He warns that our obsession with being clean is harming the microbiome that keeps us healthy
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Toxics

Pandemics result from destruction of nature, say UN and WHO

Pandemics such as coronavirus are the result of humanity's destruction of nature, according to leaders at the UN, WHO and WWF International, and the world has been ignoring this stark reality for decades.

www.theguardian.com
Population

Pandemics result from destruction of nature, say UN and WHO

Pandemics such as coronavirus are the result of humanity's destruction of nature, according to leaders at the UN, WHO and WWF International, and the world has been ignoring this stark reality for decades.

www.theguardian.com
Photo by Robin Lyon on Unsplash
Toxics

Study finds pharmaceuticals, other chemicals in remote Minnesota lakes

A study has found pharmaceuticals and other chemicals in remote lakes in and around the Grand Portage Indian Reservation in northeastern Minnesota.
www.theguardian.com
Toxics

Be a citizen scientist: track plastic waste, spot a spider monkey or beat coronavirus

Amid lockdown, internet users are tuning in to interactive data projects led by researchers.

www.theguardian.com
Biodiversity

Carl Safina: The secret call of the wild: how animals teach each other to survive

Cultural knowledge, passed from animal to animal, is key to how species adapt to change in the world around them
www.theguardian.com
Climate

Oceans can be restored to former glory within 30 years, say scientists

Major review reports recovery of marine life but a redoubling of efforts is still needed
www.theguardian.com
Toxics

Air pollution likely to increase coronavirus death rate, warn experts

The health damage inflicted on people by long-standing air pollution in cities is likely to increase the death rate from coronavirus infections, experts have said.

montrealgazette.com
Climate

Global warming could skew the process of turtle reproduction, experts warn

Experts are worried that global warming could interfere in the reproduction process of egg-laying reptiles such a turtles and crocodiles since the sex of their progeny is determined by temperature.

www.theguardian.com
Climate

The five: Changes in animal behaviour due to global heating

Species around the world are being forced to alter their diet, migratory patterns, feeding grounds and more.

www.newscientist.com
Toxics

We constantly eat microplastics. What does that mean for our health?

Tiny particles of plastic are in our food, water and even the air we breathe. There is insufficient evidence to establish the impact of microplastics on human health. But the absence of evidence doesn't mean they are harmless.

Climate

Climate change may be making deer evolve to give birth earlier in the year, scientists discover

Researchers say their findings represent some of the first evidence that evolutionary changes are affecting the time of year that wild animals give birth.
www.nature.com
Climate

California biologists are using wildfires to assess health risks of smoke

As fires rage in the Bay Area, scientists launch study to track long-term effects of smoke on the heart, lungs and immune system.
ohiovalleyresource.org
Toxics

Mussel Woman: Biologist passes along pears of wisdom about threatened mussels

Janet Clayton has studied freshwater mussels for 30 years. Now she's passing along her knowledge -- and raising alarms -- about these endangered animals.
From our Newsroom

Veeps and the environment

On the environment, Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris are worlds apart. But don't expect it to be front and center in the campaigning.

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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