Coronavirus UK: Infection risk higher in areas with air pollution

People are more likely to catch Covid-19 in areas with bad air pollution because particles can 'carry' the virus, scientists have claimed.

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www.theguardian.com
Justice

COVID-19 impact on ethnic minorities linked to housing and air pollution

The severe impact of Covid-19 on people from minority ethnic groups has been linked to air pollution and overcrowded and poor-standard homes by a study of 400 hospital patients.

www.theguardian.com
Toxics

Manchester becomes latest UK city to delay clean air zone

The creation of the biggest clean air zone in the UK to tackle illegal levels of air pollution is being delayed by a year because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Toxics

One way the coronavirus could transform Europe’s cities: More space for bikes

European cities are already reclaiming portions of busy thoroughfares to install new bike lanes.
www.independent.co.uk
Toxics

Birmingham could ban private cars from driving through city centre

Birmingham may become the first British city to ban private cars from driving through its city centre, according to a new transport plan published by the council.

www.washingtonpost.com
Justice

The EPA wanted to clean up toxic soil in Alabama. Why did a lobbyist, a lawyer and a legislator try to stop them?

The EPA wanted to remove toxic waste from a Birmingham neighborhood, which would have cost tens of millions of dollars. The state’s influence machine kicked into high gear.
Drummond Coal's ABC Coke plant is at the heart of a bribery scandal that has led to prison terms for the three people and ethics charges against two more. (Credit: Matt Smith)
Originals

From coal lobbyists to community leaders—the plot to keep Birmingham polluted

Editor's note: This is part two of a two-part series on a recent bribery trial over a toxic Superfund site in Birmingham, Alabama. Read part one here.

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Charlie Powell (Credit: Matt Smith)
Originals

Pollution, prejudice and profiteering politicians in Birmingham, Alabama

Editor's note: This is part one of a two-part series on a recent bribery trial over a toxic Superfund site in Birmingham, Alabama. Read part two here.

Keep reading... Show less
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Alabama coal executive and lawyer are guilty of bribing politician over pollution cleanup

The men were found guilty of bribing a former state representative to oppose Environmental Protection Agency plans that could have made the coal company help pay to clean up a polluted Superfund site.
www.wiat.com
Justice

Train cars carrying human-waste appear in North Birmingham

An issue that has been a problem for residents in west Jefrerson and Walker counties has spread to Birmingham city limits.

www.telegraph.co.uk
Interplay

Superbugs are being spread by travellers to South Asia and the Middle East, warn health experts 

Superbugs are being spread by travellers to South Asia and the Middle East, a new study by Public Health England and the University of Birmingham has found.
Justice

'It's a horrible smell:' Parrish town council to meet over Big Sky's biosolid storage

Parrish Mayor Heather Hall said the foul smell which hung over part of the town was biosolid waste shipped from New York and New Jersey.

www.sierraclub.org
Toxics

In Alabama, a cleanup unearths toxics—and scandal

Federal prosecutors say that effort also uncovered something else: a scheme to save polluters millions by putting the neighborhood's representative in Montgomery on their payroll.

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Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

The President’s green comedy routine

A token, triumphal green moment for a president and party who just might need such a thing in an election year.

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