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BPA substitutes linked to obesity in children and teens

Two chemicals used as substitutes for bisphenol A (BPA) may contribute to childhood weight gain and obesity, according to a study published today in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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Glamour
Toxics

It's surprisingly hard to ban toxic sex toys, but here's how to protect yourself.

It's Surprisingly Hard to Ban Toxic Sex Toys, But Here's How to Protect Yourself

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Toxics

Canada groups urge government to toughen toxic chemicals law.

By Lynn Desjardins | english@rcinet.ca

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Toxics

Washington state requires reporting of 20 additional chemicals in children's products.

The Washington Department of Ecology has added 20 chemicals and deleted three others from the list of substances reportable under the state's Children's Safe Products Reporting Rule.

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Toxics

MEPs block Commission from widening endocrine disruptor definition.

MEPs block Commission from widening endocrine disruptor definition

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Toxics

Toxic time bombs.

Hormones—chemical messengers secreted by internal (endocrine) glands to control body functions—were discovered as the 20th century began, launching the field of endocrinology. Within a few decades, several natural steroids including the sex hormones estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone had been identified. But since the 1930s, we have been increasingly exposed to many endocrine disruptors—artificial organic substances that mimic natural hormones and can threaten human health.

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Toxics

Commentary: Scientific challenges in the risk assessment of food contact materials.

Scientific Challenges in the Risk Assessment of Food Contact Materials

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Toxics

'BPA-free' products abound, but are the alternatives any better?

FIVE YEARS AGO, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration officially banned the use of the chemical bisphenol A — commonly referred to as BPA — in plastic baby bottles and sippy cups. A year later, the agency extended the ban to the chemical’s use in baby formula packaging. Manufacturers had used BPA for decades, but modern research in animal models and human cell cultures suggested that the estrogen-like chemical can leach from containers to food and, particularly in infants, potentially affect prostate and brain function.

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