Endocrine disrupting chemicals are an “under-appreciated” diabetes risk factor

Researchers say doctors and policymakers need to factor environmental health into diabetes prevention and treatment.

We've long known that aspects of modern life — eating sugary foods or sitting for long stretches in front of the tv or steering wheel, for example — contribute to diabetes.

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Toxics

'These are products that are everywhere': study finds household chemicals may reduce male fertility

Exposure to some chemicals during pregnancy seems to have negative effects on the fertility of their sons 20 years later, according to a new study.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The everyday chemicals that might be leading us to our extinction

In “Count Down,” Shanna Swan tells a story of declining sperm count, rising infertility and the possible extinction of the human species.
www.ctvnews.ca
Toxics

Environmental groups applaud Loblaw's commitment to phase out receipts with phenol

Loblaw Companies Ltd. is winning praise from a coalition of environmental, health and labour groups for its commitment to stop using receipt paper that contains a potentially dangerous chemical.
theintercept.com
Toxics

Shanna Swan: Toxic chemicals threaten ability to reproduce

In a new book, epidemiologist Shanna Swan looks at the impact of environmental chemicals on human sexuality and reproductive systems.
ensia.com
Toxics

Life-saving drinking water disinfectants have a “dark side”

Disinfecting drinking water against pathogens is necessary, but by-products from the process are a ubiquitous — and likely growing — problem across the U.S. Solutions exist, though.

news.mongabay.com
Toxics

Are industrial chemicals killing rare whales and familiar dolphins?

Dozens of beached animals on the U.S. Atlantic Coast contained high levels of pollutants and heavy metals in their blubber and liver tissues, a new study shows.

www.floridatoday.com
Toxics

Can plastic bottle caps help cleanse the Indian River Lagoon?

Researchers found bags of bottle caps can serve as a home-base for bacteria to remove excess nitrogen from the water, lessening toxic algae blooms
www.forbes.com
Justice

Was plastics being mixed with oil in Mauritius spill to produce a horror ‘Frankenstein fuel’?

New findings from leading international scientists warn of 'unusual' characteristics discovered in Mauritius oil spill, 'unlike anything seen in an oil spill before.'

www.healthline.com
Toxics

The chemicals to avoid in your shampoo and body wash

A new study conducted by the Silent Spring Institute looks at how chemicals can build up in the body through common exposures.

Originals

The chemical BPA is widespread on beaches around the world

Beach sands around the world are laced with the chemical bisphenol-A (BPA), according to new research that calls attention to a less well-known source of exposure to the hormone-mimicking chemical.

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www.cnn.com
Toxics

High BPA levels linked to 49% greater risk of death within 10 years, study says

The chemical BPA, found in the lining of canned foods and many plastics and in thermal receipts, was linked to a 49% greater risk of death within 10 years, according to a new study.
Toxics

New experiments measure how much plastic is in our bodies

We know we’re ingesting plastic every day. But what happens to it is still a mystery. Scientists are now trying to figure out how much is staying in our organs, and what the long-term health effects might be.
Originals

More bad news for BPA: Novel analysis adds to evidence of chemical’s health effects

Exposure to minuscule amounts of bisphenol-A can cause a multitude of health problems, including effects on the developing brain, heart, and ovaries, according to a paper published on Thursday that integrates data from several animal studies.

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www.discovermagazine.com
Toxics

Many BPA-free plastics are toxic. Some are worse than BPA

More than 50 different chemicals are now pumped into consumer products in place of BPA. These BPA-free alternatives can be as bad as — or worse than — the original.
From our Newsroom

A toxic travelogue

The first four stops on a tour tracing American history through its pollution.

Breast cancer: Hundreds of chemicals identified as potential risk factors

Researchers find nearly 300 chemicals linked to breast cancer-contributing hormones in everyday products, and call for a renewed focus on women's exposure risks.

My island does not want to be resilient. We want a reclamation.

Unlearning academic jargon to understand and amplify beauty and power in Puerto Rico.

Measuring Houston’s environmental injustice from space

Satellites show communities of color are far more exposed to pollution in Houston, offering a potential new way to close data gaps and tackle disparities.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

The real story behind PFAS and Congress’ effort to clean up contamination: Op-ed

Former EPA official Jim Jones sets the record straight on 'the forever chemical' as lawmakers take up the PFAS Action Act

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