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Toxics

How the benzene tree polluted the world.

Deep in the Mariana Trench, at depths lower than the Rockies are high, rests a tin of reduced-sodium Spam.

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Toxics

Cyanide glitters for some.

Talk about cyanide, and images of a lethal pill used by spies to avoid capture come to mind. Few people outside the gold mining industry know that sodium cyanide is used in most of the world’s production of the precious metal.

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Toxics

Will federal safety panel ban toxic flame retardants in household products?

Manufacturers long ago stopped adding a cancer-causing flame retardant to children's pajamas, but federal officials failed to ban the chemical during the late 1970s and as recently as five years ago it was the most widely used fire-resistant compound in household furniture.

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Climate

Energy-efficient green buildings may emit hazardous chemicals.

(Reuters Health) - Newly renovated low-income housing units in Boston earned awards for green design and building but flunked indoor air-quality tests, a new study shows.

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Climate

Thirty years after Montreal pact, solving the ozone problem remains elusive.

ANALYSIS

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Kevin Krejci
Toxics

Moms most exposed to pesticides more likely to have preterm babies.

(Reuters Health) - Women exposed to the highest quantities of agricultural pesticides in California’s San Joaquin Valley while pregnant were at heightened risk of giving birth prematurely and delivering low-weight infants, a new study found.

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Toxics

Australia emits mercury at double the global average.

A report released this week by advocacy group Environmental Justice Australia presents a confronting analysis of toxic emissions from Australia’s coal-fired power plants.

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Toxics

Thirty years after the Montreal Protocol, solving the ozone problem remains elusive.

Despite a ban on chemicals like chlorofluorocarbons, the ozone hole over Antarctica remains nearly as large as it did when the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987. Scientists now warn of new threats to the ozone layer, including widespread use of ozone-eating chemicals not covered by the treaty.

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Toxics

ICL says level of damage caused by desert spill still unknown.

Potash and fertilizer producer Israel Chemicals (ICL) said on Sunday it cannot estimate the level of damage caused to the company or the environment by a spill at its fertilizer plant in Israel's Negev desert.

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Water

Brain-eating amoeba positive test sites identified, meeting scheduled.

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Toxics

Infamous Michigan chemical plant cleanup gets $9.7M from EPA.

ST. LOUIS, MI -- A major Michigan Superfund site is getting nearly $10 million from the Environmental Protection Agency this year to start cleaning up the toxic leftovers from an infamous chemical plant that made now-banned pesticides and fire retardants.

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Toxics

How sea sponges make toxic flame retardants.

Toxic flame retardants previously used in mattresses and furniture are also produced by South Pacific sea sponges that manufacture the chemical with the help of bacteria, scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography revealed in a new study.

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Toxics

Public demand is overwhelming gene banks’ public service.

Public Demand is Overwhelming Gene Banks’ Public Service

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From our Newsroom

Bhopal nocturne

35 years after the chemical industry's worst accident, have we learned any lessons? A petrochemical buildout along the Ohio River suggests we haven't.

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