What happens when all the bugs die?

Bee ecologist Dave Goulson imagines a world without creeping things.
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Biodiversity

Using amber-filtered bulbs instead of white light attracts fewer bugs

In a tropical rainforest study, 60 percent fewer insects visited traps illuminated in a golden glow. Researchers say the results may be widely applicable.

motherboard.vice.com
Climate

Climate change may practically sterilize male insects

Male reproductive damage under heat wave conditions could be contributing to biodiversity declines in the Anthropocene.
Credit: Stephen Hamilton
Originals

Bugs are full of our drugs—and they could be getting other critters hooked, too

Insects near streams are taking in loads of pharmaceutical drugs and can pass the compounds on to predators higher in the food chain, such as frogs, birds and bats, according to a new study.

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www.telegraph.co.uk
Interplay

Superbugs are being spread by travellers to South Asia and the Middle East, warn health experts 

Superbugs are being spread by travellers to South Asia and the Middle East, a new study by Public Health England and the University of Birmingham has found.
From our Newsroom

Alabama PFAS manufacturing plant creates the climate pollution of 125,000 cars

The manufacturing plant responsible for PFAS-coated fast food packaging pumps out loads of a banned ozone-depleting compound along with "forever chemicals."

LISTEN: EHN's Pittsburgh reporter featured on "We Can Be" podcast

"I believe that true, well-told stories have the power to change the world for good."

Weaponization of water in South Asia

Climate change and unbalanced regional political power are driving an ongoing water crisis in Bangladesh.

Global action on harmful PFAS chemicals is long overdue: Study

"We already know enough about the harm being caused by these very persistent substances to take action to stop all non-essential uses and to limit exposure from legacy contamination."

Ocean plastic pollution

Too much plastic is ending up in the ocean — and making its way back onto our dinner plates.

Pennsylvania vows to regulate PFAS in drinking water—again—but regulations are at least two years away

The chemicals, linked to health problems including cancer and thyroid disease, have contaminated drinking water in Pittsburgh communities like Coraopolis and McKeesport.

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