www.nytimes.com

The city where cars are not welcome

As automakers promise to get rid of internal combustion engines, Heidelberg is trying to get rid of autos.
Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

NYC subway service could be cut 40% if no federal aid arrives

On Wednesday, transit officials announced some new details of proposed service cuts, including slashing weekend service and eliminating bus lines, to address its multibillion-dollar budget hole.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

California is trying to jump-start the hydrogen economy

The fuel could play an important role in fighting climate change, but it has been slow to gain traction because of high costs.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

How VW’s diesel settlement is changing fleets, from schools to seaports

A scandal led to a $2.9 billion trust fund for states to put cleaner vehicles on their roads. A lot of the money has gone to more diesel vehicles.
Plastic Pollution

Reports: Work at Shell cracker plant will stop because of increase in coronavirus cases

There have been nine confirmed COVID-19 cases at Shell Chemical’s new ethane cracker plant in Beaver County, according to a company spokesperson.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

How cities are trying to avert gridlock after coronavirus lockdowns

As coronavirus lockdowns loosen around the world, city leaders are scrambling to address a new problem: the prospect of gridlock worse than before the pandemic.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

New rule in California will require zero-emissions trucks

More than half of trucks sold in the state must be zero-emissions by 2035, and all of them by 2045.
www.nationalgeographic.com
Toxics

Your daily commute won't ever be the same

Coronavirus will upend—but perhaps make healthier—the ways we use trains, buses, and bike lanes in our post-pandemic future.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Transit has been battered by coronavirus. What's ahead may be worse

“The number of scenarios that we have to plan for is staggering.”
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Making yellow school buses a little more green

Some school districts are replacing diesel buses with electric models to benefit students and the environment. But the change is expensive so utilities like Dominion Energy are helping offset the cost.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Should public transit be free? More cities say, why not?

Mayors are considering waiving fares for bus service as a way to fight inequality and lower carbon emissions. Critics wonder who will pay for it.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

After spike in deaths, New York to get 250 miles of protected bike lanes

The city will build the lanes as part of a $1.7 billion street safety plan to be adopted by Mayor Bill de Blasio and the City Council.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Cars all but banned on one of Manhattan's busiest streets

Starting on Thursday, cars are no longer welcome on 14th Street, a major crosstown route for 21,000 vehicles a day.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Traffic experiment in NYC: Cars all but banned on major street

The sweeping restrictions come as New York and other cities fundamentally rethink the role of cars in the face of unrelenting traffic that is choking their streets, poisoning the environment and crippling public transit systems.

From our Newsroom

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.