www.nytimes.com

Why anti-Covid plastic barriers in classrooms and restaurants may make things worse

Clear barriers have sprung up at restaurants, nail salons and school classrooms, but most of the time, they do little to stop the spread of the coronavirus.
Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Climate crisis turns world's subways into flood zones

Swift, deadly flooding in China this week inundated a network that wasn’t even a decade old, highlighting the risks faced by cities globally.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Arrival developing electric vehicles without assembly line

Arrival, a developer of electric vans and buses, says it has come up with a cheaper way to build vehicles in small factories. But can it deliver on that promise?
www.nytimes.com
Climate

America favors cars over public transit. Can Biden change that?

The president’s infrastructure plan tries to break from the past by shifting spending away from new roads and toward public transit. It won’t be easy.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

America favors cars over public transit. Can Biden change that?

The president’s infrastructure plan tries to break from the past by shifting spending away from new roads and toward public transit. It won’t be easy.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Farhad Manjoo: We need buses, buses everywhere

Better service would improve millions of Americans’ lives.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The city where cars are not welcome

As automakers promise to get rid of internal combustion engines, Heidelberg is trying to get rid of autos.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

NYC subway service could be cut 40% if no federal aid arrives

On Wednesday, transit officials announced some new details of proposed service cuts, including slashing weekend service and eliminating bus lines, to address its multibillion-dollar budget hole.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

California is trying to jump-start the hydrogen economy

The fuel could play an important role in fighting climate change, but it has been slow to gain traction because of high costs.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

How VW’s diesel settlement is changing fleets, from schools to seaports

A scandal led to a $2.9 billion trust fund for states to put cleaner vehicles on their roads. A lot of the money has gone to more diesel vehicles.
Plastic Pollution

Reports: Work at Shell cracker plant will stop because of increase in coronavirus cases

There have been nine confirmed COVID-19 cases at Shell Chemical’s new ethane cracker plant in Beaver County, according to a company spokesperson.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

How cities are trying to avert gridlock after coronavirus lockdowns

As coronavirus lockdowns loosen around the world, city leaders are scrambling to address a new problem: the prospect of gridlock worse than before the pandemic.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

New rule in California will require zero-emissions trucks

More than half of trucks sold in the state must be zero-emissions by 2035, and all of them by 2045.
www.nationalgeographic.com
Toxics

Your daily commute won't ever be the same

Coronavirus will upend—but perhaps make healthier—the ways we use trains, buses, and bike lanes in our post-pandemic future.
From our Newsroom

Researchers, doctors call for regulators to reassess safety of taking acetaminophen during pregnancy

The painkiller, taken by half of pregnant women worldwide, could be contributing to rising rates of reproductive system problems and neurodevelopmental disorders like ADHD and autism.

LISTEN: Azmal Hossan on the sociology of climate crises in South Asia

"If we look at the rate of carbon emissions, most is emitted by the developed and industrialized countries, but the problem is poor countries like Bangladesh are the main sufferers."

Op-ed: We don’t have time for another fossil fuel bridge

Those holding up carbon capture and hydrogen as new climate solutions are leading us down the wrong path.

Climate storytelling: Creativity and imagination in the face of bleak realities

Working with youth writers on a climate-fiction screenplay has opened my eyes to the power of the arts in confronting environmental crises.

Ocean plastic pollution

Too much plastic is ending up in the ocean — and making its way back onto our dinner plates.

Peter Dykstra: Protected by an alphabet soup of acronyms

CITES, CCAMLR, LDC, MBTA, CBD, Ramsar, LWCF ... they may make your eyes glaze over, but they protect our health and planet.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.