Reports: Work at Shell cracker plant will stop because of increase in coronavirus cases

There have been nine confirmed COVID-19 cases at Shell Chemical’s new ethane cracker plant in Beaver County, according to a company spokesperson.
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Climate

How cities are trying to avert gridlock after coronavirus lockdowns

As coronavirus lockdowns loosen around the world, city leaders are scrambling to address a new problem: the prospect of gridlock worse than before the pandemic.

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Toxics

New rule in California will require zero-emissions trucks

More than half of trucks sold in the state must be zero-emissions by 2035, and all of them by 2045.
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Toxics

Your daily commute won't ever be the same

Coronavirus will upend—but perhaps make healthier—the ways we use trains, buses, and bike lanes in our post-pandemic future.
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Justice

Transit has been battered by coronavirus. What's ahead may be worse

“The number of scenarios that we have to plan for is staggering.”
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Justice

Making yellow school buses a little more green

Some school districts are replacing diesel buses with electric models to benefit students and the environment. But the change is expensive so utilities like Dominion Energy are helping offset the cost.
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Justice

Should public transit be free? More cities say, why not?

Mayors are considering waiving fares for bus service as a way to fight inequality and lower carbon emissions. Critics wonder who will pay for it.
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Toxics

After spike in deaths, New York to get 250 miles of protected bike lanes

The city will build the lanes as part of a $1.7 billion street safety plan to be adopted by Mayor Bill de Blasio and the City Council.
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Toxics

Cars all but banned on one of Manhattan's busiest streets

Starting on Thursday, cars are no longer welcome on 14th Street, a major crosstown route for 21,000 vehicles a day.
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Toxics

Traffic experiment in NYC: Cars all but banned on major street

The sweeping restrictions come as New York and other cities fundamentally rethink the role of cars in the face of unrelenting traffic that is choking their streets, poisoning the environment and crippling public transit systems.

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Climate

Free public transport is an attractive idea. But would it solve our traffic woes?

Fewer cars, less congestion, less pollution. It's a tantalising prospect, but do the promises of free public transport stack up?
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Climate

California requires new city buses to be electric by 2029

California became the first state to mandate a full shift to electric buses in public transit, flexing its muscle as an environmental regulator.
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Climate

The wheels on these buses go round and round with zero emissions

Some states, concerned about pollution and global warming, see school buses as the next frontier for electric vehicles. Prices are high, but that's starting to change.
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Climate

Buses, delivery vans and garbage trucks are the electric vehicles next door

As American car buyers cautiously dip their toes into the world of electric vehicles, pondering issues such as cost, charging times and driving range, big businesses and some government agencies are going in headfirst.

From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

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