Hurricanes get names. What about heat waves?

Short, distinctive names are assigned to storms to raise awareness about their dangers. Some experts argue for doing the same for heat waves, which can be even deadlier.
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C.D.C. warns of superbug fungus outbreaks in 2 cities

For the first time, the C.D.C. identified several cases of Candida auris that were resistant to all drugs, in two health facilities in Texas and a long-term care center in Washington, D.C.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Why vaccinated people are getting 'breakthrough' infections

The vaccines are effective at preventing serious illness and death, but they are not a golden shield against the coronavirus.
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Toxics

C.D.C. director warns of a 'pandemic of the unvaccinated'

Cases, hospitalizations and deaths remain far below last winter’s peak, but the director urged people to get fully vaccinated.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

F.D.A. attaches warning of rare nerve syndrome to Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine

Federal regulators concluded that the risk of developing the syndrome was low, and that the benefits of the vaccine still strongly outweigh it.
investigatemidwest.org
Justice

Trump ag secretary Sonny Perdue personally lobbied to keep meatpacking plants open during pandemic, emails show

New emails obtained by nonprofit Public Citizen show Perdue personally lobbying to keep plants open, including pressing Robert Redfield, the former Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Covid's Delta variant: What scientists know

The variant is gaining traction worldwide. But vaccines are driving down coronavirus case numbers in the U.S., and it’s unclear whether Delta will reverse that trend.
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Toxics

C.D.C. advisers are expected to discuss rare heart problems in vaccinated younger people

The majority of cases have been mild, with symptoms like fatigue, chest pain and disturbances in heart rhythm that quickly clear up.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

COVID proved the CDC is broken. Can it be fixed?

The pandemic revealed the glaring weaknesses of the world’s premier public health agency — and just how much work it would take to reform it.
theintercept.com
Toxics

Expanding research complex highlights dangers of U.S. biolabs

Questions about the origins of COVID-19 raise concerns about the safety of U.S. biolabs.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

C.D.C. calls for updated childhood vaccinations after decline last year

The number of vaccine doses administered to children dropped by as much 63 percent as stay-at-home orders were issued in spring of 2020.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The C.D.C.’s new leader follows the science. Is that enough?

By all accounts, Dr. Rochelle Walensky is a fierce advocate and an empathetic scientist. But C.D.C. advice must be better attuned to the real world, critics say.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

For many workers, change in mask policy is a nightmare

After a shift by the C.D.C., employers withdrew mask policies that workers felt were protecting them from unvaccinated customers.
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Toxics

CDC will not investigate mild COVID infections with vaccinated Americans

At least 10,000 vaccinated people were infected with the coronavirus through the end of April. Now the agency has stopped pursuing the mildest cases.
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Alabama PFAS manufacturing plant creates the climate pollution of 125,000 cars

The manufacturing plant responsible for PFAS-coated fast food packaging pumps out loads of a banned ozone-depleting compound along with "forever chemicals."

LISTEN: EHN's Pittsburgh reporter featured on "We Can Be" podcast

"I believe that true, well-told stories have the power to change the world for good."

Weaponization of water in South Asia

Climate change and unbalanced regional political power are driving an ongoing water crisis in Bangladesh.

Global action on harmful PFAS chemicals is long overdue: Study

"We already know enough about the harm being caused by these very persistent substances to take action to stop all non-essential uses and to limit exposure from legacy contamination."

Ocean plastic pollution

Too much plastic is ending up in the ocean — and making its way back onto our dinner plates.

Pennsylvania vows to regulate PFAS in drinking water—again—but regulations are at least two years away

The chemicals, linked to health problems including cancer and thyroid disease, have contaminated drinking water in Pittsburgh communities like Coraopolis and McKeesport.

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