The grandfather of alt-science.

Art Robinson has seeded scientific skepticism within the GOP for decades. Now he wants to use urine to save lives.

Arthur B. Robinson, renegade chemist, failed politician, grandpa of the climate skeptics — and maybe, just maybe, our nation’s next scientist-in-chief — padded across the carpet of his homemade lab in a pair of white athletic socks. “This room, everything you see here, was built by my own sons with their own hands, including the concrete,” he said. Robinson raised and home-schooled six children in this tawny valley scratched into the hills near the town of Cave Junction, Oregon. Now his wife is dead and one of his daughters has moved away, but the rest of his kids — two veterinarians, a biochemist and a pair of nuclear engineers — remain nearby. They’ve got a lot to do: Feed the animals; maintain the lab; ward off cougars; publish their popular home-school curriculums; manage Robinson’s repeated, unsuccessful congressional campaigns; and, of course, perform high-stakes research into medicine and biochemistry.

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Toxics

Did Monsanto ignore evidence linking its weed killer to cancer?

This could be the company’s “Big Tobacco” moment.

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Climate

Wildfires: How they form, and why they're so dangerous.

As deadly wildfires continue to rage across Northern California’s wine country, with winds picking up speed overnight and worsening conditions to now include a combined 54,000 acres of torched land, it now seems more important than ever to understand how wildfires work, and their lasting implications on our health and the environment.

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Toxics

Every Tasmanian fire station to be tested for toxic foam contamination.

EVERY major fire station in Tasmania is being investigated for potential contamination from toxic chemicals used in firefighting foam — described as “the Agent Orange of firefighting”.

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Justice

2017 on course to be deadliest on record for land defenders.

The number of people killed this year while defending their community’s land, natural resources or wildlife has passed 150 – meaning 2017 is on course to be the deadliest year on record.

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Climate

Warming oceans may make ‘Nemo’ harder to find.

Like coral reefs, sea anemones—with their flashy, tentacle-like polyps that waggle and wave in vibrant reds, greens, pinks, and yellows—provide homes and hiding spots for dozens of fish species, most memorably the orange clownfish made famous in Finding Nemo. Also like coral, rising water temperatures associated with climate change can severely weaken these anemones, causing them to expel the tiny symbionts that keep them alive and lend them color, a process known as bleaching.

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Toxics

PFOA: Residents confused by latest testing results, saying, 'We are not scientists.'

MERRIMACK — Residents say they are concerned and confused by newly released blood test results that indicate a sampling of public water customers have levels of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) twice those of the average U.S. population.

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Toxics

A small town in Texas. A huge explosion. An unsolved mystery — and the long road back.

WEST, Tex. — If her son hadn’t stowed that damn ’66 Chevrolet Impala in her garage, Jeanette Holecek would have died the day her town exploded. But its sloping steel bulk was in just the right place, at just the right time, and it shielded her from the concussion that shattered her home.

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Water

Puerto Rico’s health care is in dire condition, three weeks after Maria.

CAGUAS, P.R. — Harry Figueroa, a teacher who went a week without the oxygen that helped him breathe, died here last week at 58. His body went unrefrigerated for so long that the funeral director could not embalm his badly decomposed corpse.

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Climate

'Shocking' spike in Hunter Valley's coal-linked air pollution fails to prompt action.

'Shocking' spike in Hunter Valley's coal-linked air pollution fails to prompt action

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Editorial

Superfund tax is gone, but corporate pollution remains.

Oh, the Superfund program created in 1980 was a very good idea. Industries and businesses would be held accountable, through taxes, for polluting communities all over the United States. Those taxes – paid by landfill owners, chemical companies and industrial manufacturers – paid for cleanups of polluted sites, an often expensive proposition.

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Water

Clean water vs. farm profits at heart of fertilizer-rule debate.

By Josephine Marcotty Star Tribune OCTOBER 9, 2017 — 10:24PM

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Toxics

Australia Defence could face three separate class action cases over toxic pollution at air bases.

The Federal Government could face compensation claims across New South Wales, Queensland and the Northern Territory, after the Department of Defence admitted it was slow to warn people about groundwater contamination from Army air bases.

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Toxics

SF to ban sale of upholstered furniture containing flame retardants linked to cancer.

San Francisco is expected to ban the sale of upholstered furniture with flame retardant chemicals.

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Food

The animal rights advocate reenvisioning the future of food.

By Molly Fosco

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