Warming oceans may make ‘Nemo’ harder to find.

Heat bleaches sea anemones, too, causing the iconic clownfish to stop laying eggs. Here’s how.

Like coral reefs, sea anemones—with their flashy, tentacle-like polyps that waggle and wave in vibrant reds, greens, pinks, and yellows—provide homes and hiding spots for dozens of fish species, most memorably the orange clownfish made famous in Finding Nemo. Also like coral, rising water temperatures associated with climate change can severely weaken these anemones, causing them to expel the tiny symbionts that keep them alive and lend them color, a process known as bleaching.

Keep reading... Show less
Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
Marco Becerra/flickr
Food

Battling a sport's hidden foe.

The Never-Ending Battle Against Sport’s Hidden Foe

Keep reading... Show less
Water

Hepatitis A in San Diego: An outbreak waiting to happen.

By USHA LEE MCFARLING @ushamcfarling

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Procter & Gamble plans to help wash away plastic pollution with new Fairy Liquid bottle.

Fairy's new ocean plastic bottle contains 10 per cent ocean plastic | Credit: Procter & Gamble

Keep reading... Show less
Climate

Could techno-fixes and gene therapies really save the world’s coral?

As the metaphorical canary in the global warming coalmine goes, the planet’s coral reefs are hard to beat.

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Nestle tackles 'ocean-polluter' tag in Philippines.

Nestle tackles 'ocean-polluter' tag in Philippines

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Greenpeace report: Big Western brands polluting oceans with cheap plastic in Philippines.

MANILA (AFP) - Western consumer giants are polluting oceans by selling products packaged in cheap, disposable plastic to Filipinos, Greenpeace has claimed - naming Nestle, Unilever and Procter & Gamble among the worst offenders.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate

Far away from any witnesses, my small town is being poisoned by fracking waste.

Some days, the air would smell acrid, sharp like bleach, and I would hurry from the car into the house. Other days, the wind seemed normal, unremarkable. I didn’t know why.

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Chemical industry ally faces critics in bid for top EPA post.

SCIENCE

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Acid cloud leaks from chemical plant in South Baltimore, prompting shelter-in-place alert.

A cloud of toxic acid leaked into the air at a chemical plant in South Baltimore’s Fairfield industrial area Monday morning, prompting emergency officials to warn nearby workers and residents to shelter in place for several hours.

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Dow, Evonik, Wacker claim data shows silicone material safe.

By Pat Rizzuto

Keep reading... Show less
Water

Another growing threat to Hawaii’s coral reefs: Invasive algae.

Hawaii’s corals appear to have been spared this summer from another mass bleaching, a stress response caused by warmer waters that has ravaged reefs in recent years.

Keep reading... Show less
Water

Why it’s legal to pump untreated canal water into Californians’ homes.

BRAWLEY, CALIFORNIA – It takes Humberto Lugo several minutes to explain how the home he is standing in front of actually gets its water. It’s a small, stucco house dwarfed by an expanse of dusty farm fields that sit mostly fallow in September, awaiting the next planting of winter vegetables.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate

Hurricane Irma power outages trigger widespread sewage overflows.

Hurricane Irma has left a stinky and unsanitary aftermath with widespread sewage overflows from powerless pump stations and spills from overwhelmed treatment plants.

Keep reading... Show less
Editorial

Water quality: A grave threat to public health.

Water quality: A grave threat to public health

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.