www.nationalobserver.com

Coal mine selenium found in bighorn herds in Alberta

Jeff Kneteman said Alberta Environment has known about the problem in bighorn sheep for years. But it has yet to commission any studies about the effects on the three herds and how far the contamination has spread through the local ecosystem.
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www.theguardian.com
Climate

Global renewable energy industry grew at fastest rate since 1999 last year

The world's renewable energy industry grew at its fastest pace since 1999 last year, despite the disruption caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, and may have established a standard for growth in the future, according to the International Energy Agency.

www.theguardian.com
Toxics

Wyoming stands up for coal with threat to sue states that refuse to buy it

Republican governor says measure sends message that Wyoming is 'prepared to bring litigation to protect her interests.'

www.theguardian.com
Climate

Trent Zimmerman and Philip Dunne: Investing in coal power would be an expensive mistake

The UK has enormous capacity to increase its energy supply from offshore wind. Australia too has vast potential for wind and solar power.

insideclimatenews.org
Toxics

Coal phase-down has lowered, not eliminated health risks from building energy, study says

Thanks to the phase-down of coal, the risk of premature death in the United States due to the burning of fuels for electricity, homes and businesses fell 54 to 60 percent from 2008 to 2017, Harvard researchers found in a new study.

www.fastcompany.com
Toxics

Natural gas and wood are replacing coal as the biggest pollutants

Across the country, Harvard researchers found, the negative health impacts from burning natural gas, biomass, and wood are beginning to outweigh those from burning coal.

www.climatechangenews.com
Climate

Germany raises ambition to net zero by 2045 after landmark court ruling

A surprise plan to strengthen Germany's emission targets reignites debate on quitting coal and pricing carbon ahead of September's election.

www.denverpost.com
Toxics

Battle over Suncor oil refinery intensifies as state weighs permit renewal, metro Denver residents demand closure

Metro Denver residents testifying in public hearings demanded closure of the problem-plagued Suncor Energy oil refinery, urging Colorado health officials not to renew the refinery's outdated operating permits that allow air pollution.

insideclimatenews.org
Climate

One of the country’s 10 largest coal plants just got a retirement date. What about the rest?

To survive among the shrinking fleet of U.S. coal-fired power plants, it helps to be extremely big.

thenarwhal.ca
Toxics

How the global steel industry is cutting out coal

As Alberta and B.C. mull expanding metallurgical coal mining in the Rockies, some steel manufacturers are pledging to do away with the need for the carbon-heavy material altogether.

www.theguardian.com
Climate

‘I’m not selling’: what happens when an Australian town is consumed by a US coalminer?

Col Faulkner, 68, owns the only house in Wollar that hasn’t been bought up by US-based miner Peabody
www.eenews.net
Climate

Biden disrupts detractors with war on warming, not on coal

President Biden redefined the climate fight to focus on investments rather than regulations. That scrambled the traditional model of reducing carbon emissions, and Republicans' opposition to it.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

What COVID and clear skies meant to drinking water for 300 million

Coronavirus lockdowns in South Asia reduced pollution that makes snow melt faster, which could help water supplies last longer this year.
ohiovalleyresource.org
Justice

Energy Secretary pushes regional job potential from climate action

Energy Sec. Jennifer Granholm said clean energy development will be "a massive market opportunity" for the region "if we do this right.”
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Biden’s bet on a climate transition carries big risks

The president's plans to cut emissions in half by 2030 relies heavily on a government effort to steer the development of new industries, but business leaders are fretting over the rapid timeline.

From our Newsroom

The draw—and deadlines—of American denial

From vaccines to elections to climate change, denial is doing lasting damage to the country.

What do politicians have to say about 'Fractured?'

Here are the responses we've gotten so far from politicians about our study that found Pennsylvania families living near fracking wells are being exposed to high levels of harmful industrial chemicals.

Planting a million trees in the semi-arid desert to combat climate change

Tucson's ambitious tree planting goal aims to improve the health of residents, wildlife, and the watershed.

“Allow suffering to speak:” Treating the oppressive roots of illness

By connecting the dots between medical symptoms and patterns of injustice, we move from simply managing suffering to delivering a lasting cure.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

Living near fracking wells is linked to higher rate of heart attacks: Study

Middle-aged men in Pennsylvania's fracking counties die from heart attacks at a rate 5% greater than their counterparts in New York where fracking is banned.

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