From rust to resilience: What climate change means for Great Lakes cities

Even as Great Lakes cities cope with economic turbulence, climate change brings new challenges and opportunities.

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Toxics

Cleveland's Cuyahoga River caught fire 50 years ago. It inspired a movement.

On June 22, 1969, Cleveland's filthy river ignited for the 13th and last time. It and other American rivers are dramatically cleaner today.
www.eenews.net
Toxics

Did a burning river really fuel landmark law's passage?

Cleveland's Cuyahoga River burned for the last time 50 years ago this week. It was a small fire, under control in a half hour and fully extinguished within two hours. A firefighter told reporters it "wasn't that big a deal." Yet the blaze has been credited with sparking passage of the Clean Water Act.

Originals

Peter Dykstra: A river burns through it

Sometime in the 1980's, I spoke to a crowd of a hundred or so people at Youngstown State University in the Rust Belt city in Northeast Ohio.

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expo.cleveland.com
abcnews.go.com
Water

Cuyahoga River, which inspired the creation of the EPA, is safe to fish again

Fish caught in the Cuyahoga River, famous for catching fire in the 1960s, are now safe to eat, says the Ohio EPA.
www.texasobserver.org
Toxics

Dirtying the Waters: Texas ranks first in violating water pollution rules

A new report raises questions about whether TCEQ is doing enough to protect the state’s water.
From our Newsroom

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

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