www.nytimes.com

Is dairy farming cruel to cows?

A small group of animal welfare scientists is seeking answers to that question. Facing a growing anti-dairy movement, many farmers are altering their practices.
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Food

To avoid dumping milk, dairy farmers find new market at Vermont food banks

In Vermont and across New England, the dairy industry is coming together to support struggling farmers and hungry families.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

‘We had to do something': Trying to prevent massive food waste

Some producers acknowledge the efforts are “just a drop in the bucket” of what farmers can’t sell and are destroying instead.
civileats.com
Toxics

The coronavirus pandemic is pushing dairy farmers to the brink

As prices drop and dairy farmers are forced to dump milk, industry is moving towards supply management as a possible solution.
www.nytimes.com
Food

America’s dairy farmers are hurting. A giant merger could make things worse.

The largest dairy co-op in the United States is in talks to acquire Dean Foods, a milk processing company that sought bankruptcy protection last month.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

The real problem with beef

An extensive study confirms that red meat might not be that bad for you. But it is bad for the planet, with chicken and pork less harmful than beef.
www.dw.com
Climate

′Our consumption choices are driving biodiversity loss′

Humankind is decimating plant and animal species, with alarming consequences for the planet. From the UN biodiversity conference in Egypt, Cristiana Pasca explains why preserving biodiversity is key to our survival.
www.nytimes.com
Children

‘My baby almost died’: Formula scandal sends shudders through France

Lactalis, a giant dairy products company, has had to recall more than 7,000 tons of products contaminated with salmonella. It did not alert regulators to past problems.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Elaine Khosrova: The great butter meltdown

All dairy-producing countries are vulnerable to the climate catastrophes that are squeezing France’s butter supply.
Climate

How a seed bank, almost lost in Syria's war, could help feed a warming planet.

TERBOL, Lebanon — Ali Shehadeh, a seed hunter, opened the folders with the greatest of care. Inside each was a carefully dried and pressed seed pod: a sweet clover from Egypt, a wild wheat found only in northern Syria, an ancient variety of bread wheat. He had thousands of these folders stacked neatly in a windowless office, a precious herbarium, containing seeds foraged from across the hot, arid and increasingly inhospitable region known as the Fertile Crescent, the birthplace of farming.

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Climate

Everyone knew Houston’s reservoirs would flood — except for the people who bought homes inside them.

by Neena Satija, The Texas Tribune and Reveal, Kiah Collier, The Texas Tribune, and Al Shaw, ProPublica, October 12, 2017

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Water

In the mountains of Puerto Rico, hurricane recovery is slower.

TRUJILLO ALTO, Puerto Rico (Reuters) - In the lowlands of Trujillo Alto, a sprawling suburb of San Juan, clean water once again flows in the homes of most residents. But in the mountainous part of the city, which is largely poor and semi-rural, finding clean water remains a daily struggle.

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Water

No more platform No 2s: Train toilets to stop emptying on to tracks.

The final flush on train toilets that empty their contents directly on to Britain’s tracks will be pulled in 2019, rail bosses and ministers have promised.

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Little owl sparks a large ESA flap.

The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owls that inhabit Arizona are sticking the Fish and Wildlife Service with a pretty big problem.

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Esteban Lopez
Toxics

The high price of cheap weed.

COVER STORY

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From our Newsroom

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

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