news.mongabay.com

More than 500 dams planned inside protected areas: Study

Hundreds of dams are planned within global protected areas, a prospect that threatens people, plants and animals that rely on the life-giving waters of free-flowing rivers.

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Toxics

Migratory river fish populations plunge 76% in past 50 years

Decline in species such as salmon harms entire ecosystems and livelihoods, say researchers.

Toxics

Migratory freshwater fish decline 76 percent since 1970, new report finds

Around the world, migratory freshwater fish numbers are dropping faster than migratory species both on land and in the ocean, a new study finds.
www.nationalgeographic.com
Toxics

One of world's rarest dolphins rebounding in Pakistan

Rescue efforts have boosted the Indus dolphin’s numbers, but dams on the Indus River continue to disrupt the marine mammal’s movements.
Justice

Experts see environmental, social fallout in Indonesia’s infrastructure push

To speed up infrastructure projects, the government has issued a new regulation on eminent domain that will make it easier to take over community lands.

www.michiganadvance.com
www.circleofblue.org
Toxics

Feds propose river temperature limits to protect salmon in Pacific Northwest

EPA seeks to keep Columbia and Lower Snake rivers from cooking salmon. It won't be easy, water experts say.

Climate

Communities on Brazil’s ‘River of Unity’ tested by dams, climate change

Pixaim is one of the remaining quilombos on the Atlantic coast, an Afro-Brazilian settlement already gravely impacted by upstream dams. Now climate change could doom it.
thenarwhal.ca
Justice

Why an Alberta court decision to quash an oilsands project affects Treaty Rights cases in B.C.

A recent ruling by three Appeal Court justices has transformed the nature of Treaty 8 First Nations' legal battles against the Site C dam and oil and gas development.

www.cnbc.com
Climate

More dams will collapse as aging infrastructure can't keep up with climate change

Aging dams in the U.S. will increasingly fail and cause death and environmental destruction as climate change makes extreme precipitation more frequent, scientists warn.
crosscut.com
Climate

When the Chehalis floods again, who pays the price?

With 100-year floods occurring twice a decade, a dam could offer relief — or endanger salmon and ecosystems.
Toxics

Alaska conservationists urge action on transboundary mining

Federal lawmakers have been urged by tribes and local conservation groups to address transboundary mining, which some consider a threat to southeast Alaska.

news.mongabay.com
Justice

China held water back from drought-stricken Mekong countries, report says

China's water management practices and lack of data-sharing with neighboring countries threaten the livelihoods of roughly 60 million people.

www.nytimes.com
Justice

China limited the Mekong’s flow. Other countries suffered a drought.

New research show that Beijing’s engineers appear to have directly caused the record low levels of water in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam.
apnews.com
Water

Largest US dam removal stirs debate over coveted West water

The second-largest river in California has sustained Native American tribes with plentiful salmon for millennia, provided upstream farmers with irrigation water for generations and served as a haven for retirees who built dream homes along its banks.

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