www.nytimes.com

Death Valley just recorded the hottest temperature on Earth

Scientists still have to validate the reading of 130 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday, the equivalent of 54 degrees Celsius.
Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
www.circleofblue.org
Justice

Climate change, pandemic, violence are volatile mix in Chad

A warming climate was already making life difficult in Chad, a landlocked country squeezed against the encroaching sands of the Sahara.

www.fairwarning.org
Climate

Thirsty future for American West as "megadrought" grips some of the fastest-growing U.S. cities

In the midst of an historic drought, the twin concerns of rapid growth and dwindling water supply have grown increasingly urgent across the Western U.S.
allafrica.com
Climate

Africa: What happened to Africa's ambitious green belt project?

The 15 kilometer (9.3 mile) wide Great Green Wall project stretches over 7,775 km from Senegal on the Atlantic to Eritrea on the Red Sea. The aim was to curb the Sahara Desert's spread. But major challenges remain.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

‘If you're not sweating in this town, there's something wrong'

In Marble Bar, which claims to be Australia’s hottest town, the temperature hit at least 113 degrees on 32 days this summer. Some residents worry that “there’s got to be a point where you actually start to cook.”
www.euronews.com
Climate

The woman risking her life in the desert to document climate change

Scottish adventurer Alice Morrison is setting out on a three-month, 2000km long expedition across the Sahara Desert in an effort to record the impact of the Earth heating up.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Christopher Ketcham: This land was your land

Federal agencies have been captured by the very industries they should be regulating.
psmag.com
Climate

In the desert Southwest, young leaders are reimagining what a climate conference can be

A dispatch from the fourth annual youth-led Uplift Climate Conference in New Mexico.
www.dw.com
Climate

The last drop: How plants survive in the desert

Deserts might be renowned for their arid and hostile characteristics, but they are home to some incredible plants that have developed strategies to find and use the last droplet of water.
www.washingtonpost.com
Climate

The Sahara is growing, thanks in part to climate change

Scientists say the boundaries of Earth's largest hot desert have expanded by 10 percent since 1920, suggesting that other deserts might be growing, as well.
www.newsweek.com
Climate

Earth will start becoming a desert by 2050 if global warming isn't stopped, study says

More than 25 percent of Earth will experience serious drought and desertification by the year 2050 if global warming is not curbed, according to a new study by the journal Nature Climate Change.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

The Amargosa River defies the desert

The slender, delicate stream flows through the Mojave, giving life to plants and animals found nowhere else in the world.
www.dw.com

Could we run out of sand?

Sand seems to be in limitless supply — but we are going through it faster than almost any other resource on the planet. What happens when the sand runs out?
From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.