www.fairwarning.org

Tenacious citizens take on the plastics industry over an insidious pollutant

Homegrown activists, tired of lax government enforcement and ineffectual industry self-policing, have stepped up to fight plastic pollution.

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www.nytimes.com
Toxics

‘Expect more’: Climate change raises risk of dam failures

Engineers say most dams in the United States, designed decades ago, are unsuited to a warmer world and stronger storms.
www.ozy.com
Toxics

Europe embraces plastic to fight climate change

For years, the green movement has seen plastics as villains. Europe's now turning that on its head.
www.wsj.com
Toxics

Plastic backlash leads to bets on old recycling technology

Big makers and users of plastic packaging are betting on a recycling technology, chemical recycling, that has failed for decades to take off, as new rules push them to find ways to cut waste and greenhouse-gas emissions tied to plastic.

www.apnews.com
Toxics

Bees are dying. Would a consumer ban on a pesticide help?

If you find yourself sipping a cold brew with a piece of watermelon in your hand this summer, you can thank the bees for making that snack possible.

Justice

The deadly consequences of agrochemical farming in Argentina

About 95 percent of crops are chemically-induced in Argentina, making it one of the world's leading cereal, corn, and soybean producers. But locals say underneath this growth is a story of death and disease.
Andrea Sonda/Unsplash
Originals

Dow wants to bolster use of a pesticide shown to hurt bees’ reproduction

Dow AgroSciences has applied for a large expansion of sulfoxaflor, a pesticide shown to harm bees, according to a federal notice last week.

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Originals

Commentary: Lawmakers want the EPA to ignore impacts of pesticides on endangered species

According to the latest push by House Republicans, pesticides — all of them — are so safe there's no longer any need to bother asking experts to determine their harm to our most endangered species before approving them.

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From our Newsroom

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

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