www.fairwarning.org

Tenacious citizens take on the plastics industry over an insidious pollutant

Homegrown activists, tired of lax government enforcement and ineffectual industry self-policing, have stepped up to fight plastic pollution.

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www.nytimes.com
Toxics

‘Expect more’: Climate change raises risk of dam failures

Engineers say most dams in the United States, designed decades ago, are unsuited to a warmer world and stronger storms.
www.ozy.com
Toxics

Europe embraces plastic to fight climate change

For years, the green movement has seen plastics as villains. Europe's now turning that on its head.
www.wsj.com
Toxics

Plastic backlash leads to bets on old recycling technology

Big makers and users of plastic packaging are betting on a recycling technology, chemical recycling, that has failed for decades to take off, as new rules push them to find ways to cut waste and greenhouse-gas emissions tied to plastic.

www.apnews.com
Toxics

Bees are dying. Would a consumer ban on a pesticide help?

If you find yourself sipping a cold brew with a piece of watermelon in your hand this summer, you can thank the bees for making that snack possible.

Justice

The deadly consequences of agrochemical farming in Argentina

About 95 percent of crops are chemically-induced in Argentina, making it one of the world's leading cereal, corn, and soybean producers. But locals say underneath this growth is a story of death and disease.
Andrea Sonda/Unsplash
Originals

Dow wants to bolster use of a pesticide shown to hurt bees’ reproduction

Dow AgroSciences has applied for a large expansion of sulfoxaflor, a pesticide shown to harm bees, according to a federal notice last week.

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Originals

Commentary: Lawmakers want the EPA to ignore impacts of pesticides on endangered species

According to the latest push by House Republicans, pesticides — all of them — are so safe there's no longer any need to bother asking experts to determine their harm to our most endangered species before approving them.

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From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

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