Pharmaceutical makers sending drug-spiked water to treatment plants

Water treatment plants near drug makers are getting heavily drugged.

Wastewater treatment plants taking discharges from nearby pharmaceutical manufacturers have "substantially" higher concentrations of drugs in the water, according to a new national study.

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Toxics

What if DuPont had gone green in North Carolina?

By Catherine Clabby

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Toxics

Study: Rain and snow can transport chemicals to Minnesota's lakes, rivers.

A new study offers an explanation to the mystery of why pharmaceuticals and other chemicals are found in remote Minnesota lakes, far from developed land that would create contaminated runoff.

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Toxics

VIDEO: Study finds mood-altering drugs, like Zoloft, in fish.

NYS Exposed: Study finds mood-altering drugs, like Zoloft, in fish

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Toxics

Antidepressant drugs end up in Great Lakes fish.

A new study might depress anyone concerned with Great Lakes water quality.

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Toxics

Hampton Roads treating wastewater till it’s good enough to return to aquifer.

Rebuilding depleted drinking water supply could also reduce rate of sea level rise, slash pollution

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Toxics

Cleaner water helps male fish again look and act like guys.

Some types of water pollution can make male fish look and act like females. But a new study shows that better water treatment can prevent that. And that could allow  fish populations to thrive.

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Toxics

Pharmaceutical pollution takes toll on crayfish and other species.

Drugs seeping into groundwater threaten crayfish and have a domino effect of environmental impacts that harm fish and other species, according to new research.

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Toxics

The plan to test cities’ sewage for drugs is a new form of mass surveillance.

The Plan to Test Cities’ Sewage for Drugs Is a New Form of Mass Surveillance

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Toxics

Drug traces found in state waters may be enough to harm fish, agency finds.

Dan Gunderson · Moorhead, Minn. · Jan 12, 2017

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Toxics

Percentage of intersex fish drops after sewage treatment plant upgrades.

Hormones in treated wastewater can make male fish grow testes that are more like ovaries

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Pierson Hill
Originals

A little Prozac makes guppies most peculiar.

A little bit of an anti-depressant makes wild guppies less active, camp out more under plants and freeze up for longer after something scares them, according to a new study.

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Toxics

The surprising side effect of anti-anxiety medication—on salmon.

Anxiety takes a toll on people: they worry, they feel irritable, they avoid social gatherings—like that upcoming New Year’s Eve party. Juvenile salmon also experience stress when faced with unfamiliar situations, such as migrating out to sea where they’ll encounter predators. While anti-anxiety medication helps countless humans function better in their daily lives, new research shows the drugs also make salmon less inhibited, which can have potentially devastating effects.

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From our Newsroom

Hidden gotcha in artificial turf installations

With heightened awareness around the country about the health effects of PFAS, calculations for what artificial turf installations actually cost over their full life-time may send a shock through the artificial turf industry

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