Douglas Fischer/Daily Climate

A climate solution that also lifts Indigenous rights.

Deep questions about justice run through these United Nations talks underway here in Bonn. Few run deeper than Indigenous rights.

BONN – Addressing climate change has always involved far more than simply trimming emissions or promoting renewable energy.

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Climate Reality
Originals

Critical condition: Health experts sound the climate alarm.

ATLANTA—In a gathering impacted by presidential politics, an all-star cast of public health experts largely stuck to their own bleak script: Climate change is poised to unleash an unprecedented, global public health crisis.

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UNICEF Ethiopia
Originals

Clean energy grows, but many of the poorest remain in the dark.

Energy access, efficiency and renewables are on the rise in many developing nations, but in places like Sub-Saharan Africa, the energy situation is still grim and hundreds of millions remain unconnected, according to a new World Bank report. 

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Originals

Michigan mine gains two state permits; tribe vows to continue fight.

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality this week approved a general mining permit and an air use permit for the Back Forty mine in the western Upper Peninsula despite tribal opposition over its location on sacred ground.

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Brian Bienkowski
Originals

2016 and beyond: Justice jumping genres.

There I was in a mid-March snowstorm riding shotgun in a truck heading south through the Crow reservation in Montana. I made a stupid comment to break the silence: "Man, there is nothing out there."

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Originals

From the Sioux to the Sault: Standing Rock spirit spreads to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

SAULT STE. MARIE, Mich.—Two blocks south of the St. Mary's River and passing freighters, children from JKL Bahweting tribal school poured off buses, carrying drums, dancing and chanting.

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Originals

“We are a salmon people”.

SEATTLE—Michael Evans isn't a regular on Facebook, so he missed word that inclement weather had canceled the canoe portion of the Salmon Homecoming Celebration. His Snohomish Tribe canoe family would be the only paddlers to take on the choppy waters that Saturday in September.

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Originals

Tribal commissions fight for fishing rights.

Disparate tribal voices in Washington state found unity in the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, which was created following the Boldt Decision. The decision spider-webbed out to other regional bands of tribes coalescing around shared fishing rights.

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Minnesota Solar Challenge/flickr
Originals

Rethinking energy and justice in the Trump era.

The same communities that have been losers in the fossil fuel economy—think West Virginia coal towns and inner cities in refinery shadows—need to be the spots where small-scale clean energy takes hold, said experts on Thursday. 

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Originals

Drinking water in Indian Country: More violations, less EPA.

Tribal drinking water utilities and wastewater treatment plants are far less likely to be federally inspected or receive enforcement despite more violations than non-tribal facilities, according to a new analysis of federal water laws done by Texas A&M; University researchers.

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Jon Lin Photography/flickr
Originals

Environmental justice in Canada’s Chemical Valley.

Editor's Note: The following is an excerpt from Wiebe's new book Everyday Exposure: Indigenous Mobilization and Environmental Justice in Canada’s Chemical Valley, published by UBC Press, Vancouver and Toronto, Canada.

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Courtesy Virginia Organizing
Originals

VIDEO: Calling out pollution, two dozen are arrested in Virginia.

Calling out pollution, two dozen are arrested in Virginia

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Originals

One tribe's 'long walk' upstream for environmental and cultural justice.

MARINETTE, Wisc.—Pre-dawn purple and gold and orange swirl deep overhead as the waterfront stirs to life. It's 6 a.m. at Menekaunee Harbor, where the Menominee River empties into Lake Michigan: Workers file into buildings, heavy machinery fires up and 18-wheelers roar and belch and hit the road.

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UBC School of Journalism
Originals

Analysis: Environmental journalism reaches middle age, with mixed results.

Analysis: Environmental journalism reaches middle age, with mixed results

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