www.nytimes.com

Finally, the first room-temperature superconductor

It conveys electricity in the climate of a crisp fall day, but only under pressures comparable to what you’d find closer to Earth’s core.
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Toxics

Products we use every day are full of harmful chemicals. Can green chemistry lead to safer alternatives?

Organization and consumer demand for products that don't harm people or pollute the environment are moving forward-thinking brands toward safer ingredients.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Europe wants a 'right to repair' smartphones and gadgets

The European Union is seeking to help consumers fix or upgrade devices, rather than replace them, as part of a 30-year push to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Justice

What challenges do consumer electronics companies face in addressing their chemical footprint?

The vast scale of their supply chains is just one of the potential obstacles to grapple with as businesses take their latest steps towards managing hazardous chemicals.

www.reuters.com
Climate

U.S. blocking G20 mention of climate change in draft communique, diplomats say

The United States is against mentioning climate change in the communique of the world's financial leaders, G20 diplomats said, after a new draft of the joint statement showed the G20 are considering including it as a risk factor to growth.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The price of recycling old laptops: Toxic fumes in Thailand’s lungs

The e-waste industry is booming in Southeast Asia, frightening residents worried for their health. Despite a ban on imports, Thailand is a center of the business.
newrepublic.com
Climate

Climate change is the symptom. Consumer culture is the disease

A new report makes clear where much of the blame lies for our warming planet.
earth911.com
Climate

10 things you can do today for the environment

Humanity has 12 years to change its carbon ways.

Food

In Britain, chefs stir up food waste revolution in the kitchen

As a young cook working in a high-end restaurant, Douglas McMaster once saw hundreds of gem lettuces peeled directly into the bin and thrown out with only their root served - as garnish.

Climate

China, India outsource emissions, risking climate goal

A shift to manufacturing in cheaper Asian nations could thwart attempts to curb carbon emissions in line with the Paris Agreement.

Climate

Apple says repeal of EPA carbon plan would threaten investments

Apple Inc said on Friday it opposes any repeal by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of the Clean Power Plan, which is a priority of the agency's Administrator Scott Pruitt and would reverse an Obama-era program to curb greenhouse gases.
Originals

E-waste grew 8 percent in just 2 years. Just one-fifth was recycled.

In 2016, more than 44 million metric tons of electronic waste was generated, which is 8 percent higher than the total in 2014, according to a new report.

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www.reuters.com
Children

Apple leads way in tracing cobalt from Congo, Microsoft lags: Amnesty

Apple is leading the way in tracing cobalt used in its electronics to ensure the metal has not been mined by children in Democratic Republic of Congo while Microsoft is lagging, Amnesty International said.
From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

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