The dangers of opinion masquerading as fact in science journals: Jerrold J. Heindel

A call for unbiased, honest science in peer-reviewed journals.

An article written by a group of 19 toxicologists has been published verbatim in eight toxicology journals in the last four months.

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Originals

The danger of hormone-mimicking chemicals in medical devices and meds

Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in medicine and medical devices is grossly underestimated, and physicians have an ethical obligation to talk about these exposures with their patients, according to a new study.

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stateimpact.npr.org
Toxics

Household chemicals that harm fish were found in Susquehanna River. This research aims to help

Lead scientist Katie Hayden plans to publish recommendations for products people can use that don't have the harmful chemicals, which are called endocrine-disrupting compounds.

Originals

Indoor air pollution and heavy metals linked to child obesity

When it comes to our bodies, we are what we eat—or so the adage goes.

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www.dw.com
Toxics

What′s driving Europe′s stance on glyphosate?

Chemicals giant Bayer has reached a settlement to end most of the current US lawsuits. Its glyphosate-based weed killer Roundup causes cancer, plaintiffs insist, bit it's still used in many places in Europe and beyond.

Originals

Endocrine disruptors in Europe: Nineteen "experts" are polluting the debate

Editor's note: This article was originally published at Le Monde and is republished here with permission.

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live.staticflickr.com
Toxics

Sunscreen chemical research fails to find harm

Despite what can seem like alarming research, a dermatologist says the products are not necessarily dangerous.
www.nytimes.com
Opinion

Margaret Renkl: America’s killer lawns

Homeowners use up 10 times more pesticide per acre than farmers do. But we can change what we do in our own yards.
grist.org
Toxics

Can’t eat gluten? Pesticides and nonstick pans might have something to do with it, study says

Researchers found that children with high levels of pesticides in their blood are twice as likely to develop celiac.
Originals

The perils of making decisions in the dark: Kathryn Rodgers

The COVID-19 crisis has revealed the harmful consequences of leaders making critical decisions based on insufficient data, which end up hurting the most vulnerable communities.

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Originals

Confronting the chemicals that are worsening COVID-19

What affects how likely you are to die from the novel coronavirus?

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Toxics

Leonardo Trasande, Benard Dreyer: The pandemic will haunt today’s children forever. But we can help them now.

Stress can be an endocrine disrupter, in the same way that synthetic chemicals disrupt hormonal functions that shape the development of the brain and other body systems.

Originals

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals weaken us in our COVID-19 battle: Linda S. Birnbaum, Jerrold J. Heindel

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals masquerade as hormones. These insidious contaminants increase the diseases that cause the underlying conditions that result in susceptibility to COVID-19.

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Originals

How toxic chemicals contribute to COVID-19 deaths: Frederick vom Saal, Aly Cohen

Most people living in the U.S. are suffering from one or more chronic diseases that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified as putting people at increased risk of dying from COVID-19.

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Toxics

Toxic ‘forever chemicals’ flow freely through Cape Fear River—and now its fish

The health effects of PFAS chemicals are still under scientific investigation, but North Carolina residents worry that the abundant substances puts them in danger too.
From our Newsroom

Big Oil flows a little bit backward

Pipelines have had a very bad July (so far).

Join the “Agents of Change” discussion on research and activism

Four of the fellows who participated in the program this year will discuss their ongoing research, activism, and experiences with publishing their ideas in the public sphere.

Beyond the “silver lining” of emissions reductions: Clean energy takes a COVID-19 hit

With job loss and stifled development in the renewable energy sector, economists, politicians, and advocates say policy action is necessary to stay on track.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

Blaming the COVID-19 messengers—public health officials under siege: Derrick Z. Jackson

The pandemic has put public health officials in a perilous place—caught between the common good and the often-toxic American drive for personal freedom.

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