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Toxics

Toxic time bombs.

Hormones—chemical messengers secreted by internal (endocrine) glands to control body functions—were discovered as the 20th century began, launching the field of endocrinology. Within a few decades, several natural steroids including the sex hormones estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone had been identified. But since the 1930s, we have been increasingly exposed to many endocrine disruptors—artificial organic substances that mimic natural hormones and can threaten human health.

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Toxics

'BPA-free' products abound, but are the alternatives any better?

FIVE YEARS AGO, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration officially banned the use of the chemical bisphenol A — commonly referred to as BPA — in plastic baby bottles and sippy cups. A year later, the agency extended the ban to the chemical’s use in baby formula packaging. Manufacturers had used BPA for decades, but modern research in animal models and human cell cultures suggested that the estrogen-like chemical can leach from containers to food and, particularly in infants, potentially affect prostate and brain function.

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Toxics

Something is changing the sex of Costa Rican crocodiles.

By Mitch LeslieAug. 30, 2017 , 9:00 AM

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Toxics

Scientists spend a decade perfecting BPA removal method.

Portable catalytic system to remove oestrogen mimic from wastewater

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Toxics

Can endocrine disruptors elevate risk of breast cancer?

The American Cancer Society reports that the median age when patients are diagnosed with breast cancer is 61. This means that half of all cases of breast cancer occur in people younger than 61, and half occur in people older than 61. Although breast cancer is considered a disease of aging, in some cases, exposure to certain compounds in the environment while we’re still developing in the womb could flip the switch that turns mutated cells into breast cancer later in life.

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Toxics

Ottawa ignoring hazards of top pesticides sold in Canada.

Ottawa ignoring hazards of top pesticides sold in Canada

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Toxics

Studies shed new light on the EDC potential of BPA & BPS.

While bisphenol A is a known endocrine-disrupting compound (EDC), its substitute bisphenol S has been shown to be worrisome as well. Three new studies add more evidence that exposure to these EDCs early in life will likely lead to serious health issues later in life.

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Researchers track an unlikely culprit in weight gain.

For middle-aged women struggling with their weight, a recent spate of scientific findings sounds too good to be true. And they may be, researchers caution.

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Toxics

The great soy formula experiment.

Soy milk and soy formula contain potent human hormone disruptors. We don’t know what this means for child development.

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Toxics

How one bad science headline can echo across the internet.

The headline sounded like something out of a Margaret Atwood dystopian novel: “Fish becoming transgender from contraceptive pill chemicals being flushed down household drains.” Actually, it was a news article that appeared in The Telegraph, a well-known British newspaper, earlier this month. Its alarmist sentiment quickly spread.

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From our Newsroom

Chesapeake Energy's fall

Chesapeake Energy was a fracking pioneer on a meteoric rise. Last week, it fell to Earth.

The danger of hormone-mimicking chemicals in medical devices and meds

In an effort to bolster our health, we may be exposed to compounds that harm us. New research says physicians need to recognize and explain this hidden risk to patients.

Our annual summer reading list, 2020 edition

EHN staff shares their top book recommendations for the summer.

Coronavirus is creating a crisis of energy insecurity

Fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic has led to unpaid bills and energy shutoffs in many vulnerable US households. Indiana University researchers warn we need to act now to avoid yet another health emergency.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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