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Watch: Seneca Nation celebrates after fracking water treatment permits are revoked

"Instead of feeling tears of frustration, I'm here with tears of joy."

The Seneca Nation of Indians have declared victory after a proposed project to treat fracking wastewater at the headwaters of the Allegheny River was nixed by the local water authority. EHN previously reported on the widespread opposition to the project.

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Justice

Seneca Nation of Indians, others fire back against cease and desist letters

The Seneca Nation of Indians and others receiving cease and desist letters in connection to opposition of a proposed Coudersport, Pa.-based hydraulic fracturing waste treatment site vowed Wednesday not to back down.

Originals

Seneca Nation takes on Pittsburgh startup to defend the Allegheny River

Last month more than 100 Seneca Nation tribal members showed up at the monthly meeting of the local municipal authority in the small town of Coudersport, Pennsylvania, carrying protest signs and ceremonial drums.

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