CRISPR: Can gene-editing help nature cope with climate change?

The new technology may have missed out on this year's Nobel prize, but its potential to shape the planet is growing by the day.

By India Bourke

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Toxics

Workplace carcinogens lead to thousands of cancer cases in Ontario each year: Study.

Workplace exposure to carcinogens such as diesel exhaust, asbestos and silica are together causing thousands of cancer cases in Ontario each year, says a new study that reveals the toll of on-the-job hazardous substances.

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Toxics

Cancer, thyroid problems plague West Michigan dump neighbors.

By Garret Ellison gellison@mlive.com

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Opinion

Toxic time bombs.

Hormones—chemical messengers secreted by internal (endocrine) glands to control body functions—were discovered as the 20th century began, launching the field of endocrinology. Within a few decades, several natural steroids including the sex hormones estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone had been identified. But since the 1930s, we have been increasingly exposed to many endocrine disruptors—artificial organic substances that mimic natural hormones and can threaten human health.

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Jack Zalium
Food

How big business got Brazil hooked on junk food.

How Big Business

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Climate

Small changes, big impact: How to reduce waste in your daily life.

LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Each person on the planet produces more than 1 kg (2.2 lb) of waste every day, and that number is expected to increase in the next 15 years, according to the World Bank.

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Children

Why giving birth is safer in Britain than in the US.

This story was co-published with NPR.

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Justice

NYU researchers study Ford Superfund, Ramapough-Lenape's health.

RINGWOOD – Researchers from New York University are asking members of the Ramapough-Lenape tribe to serve as citizen scientists as they study conditions in Ford Motor Co.'s former dumping grounds and their possible impact on the health of the community.

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Toxics

What’s warping the faces of monkeys in Uganda?

In 2014, researchers with the National Museum of Natural History in Paris working in the northern part of Uganda’s Kibale National Park, noticed something very wrong with the chimpanzees and baboons in the area: their noses were flattened, with nostrils that were abnormally small, or sometimes absent altogether. Their faces were concave in the middle. At the time, researchers estimated that around 10 percent of the chimpanzee population in that part of the park had these facial deformities, otherwise known as dysplasia. Two years later, that estimate jumped up to 25 percent.

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Toxics

$417 million awarded in suit tying Johnson’s baby powder to cancer.

In what may be the largest award so far in a lawsuit tying ovarian cancer to talcum powder, a Los Angeles jury on Monday ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $417 million in damages to a medical receptionist who developed ovarian cancer after using the company’s trademark Johnson’s Baby Powder on her perineum for decades.

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Tanja Heffner
Toxics

Why women of color are being exposed to harmful chemicals in beauty products.

New research published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology confirms that women of color are being exposed to higher levels of beauty-product-derived chemicals like mercury, steroids and hormone-disruptors than white women, most likely because of racist beauty ideals.

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Blood test finds cancer before symptoms start.

Researchers say they have taken a big step towards developing a test that can tell people if they have cancer long before the first symptoms show up.

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Toxics

Can endocrine disruptors elevate risk of breast cancer?

The American Cancer Society reports that the median age when patients are diagnosed with breast cancer is 61. This means that half of all cases of breast cancer occur in people younger than 61, and half occur in people older than 61. Although breast cancer is considered a disease of aging, in some cases, exposure to certain compounds in the environment while we’re still developing in the womb could flip the switch that turns mutated cells into breast cancer later in life.

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Modern life means less gut bacteria, more chronic disease.

BY CYNTHIA WALLENTINE MON 3:36 PM

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Toxics

People in Oman asked not to drink from plastic bottles kept in sun.

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