Inside the uphill fight for clean water in California’s Central Valley

More than 1 million Californians, many of them living in the state's agricultural heartland, still do not have access to clean water.

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thewalrus.ca
Justice

The struggles of sustainable farming

If you're paying $1 for lettuce, somebody's being exploited. So is the environment.

news.mongabay.com
Justice

Photos: In southern Papua, navigating an alien world built on palm oil

Indonesia is the world's top producer of palm oil, but many Papuans have lost their land and are struggling to acclimatize to a very new world, with their traditional food sources dwindling.

www.nationalgeographic.com
Justice

A water crisis looms for 270 million people as South Asia’s glaciers shrink

Melting ice is crucial to the thirsty Indus River region. But now the flow is projected to decline, posing risks for agriculture and a growing population.
thefern.org
Toxics

As COVID-19 hobbles the industrial meat industry, small producers are having a moment

They're more resilient and better able to take care of their workers. But their products cost more and are less convenient to get—the two things Americans value most.

stateimpact.npr.org
Toxics

Fight over natural gas tax break divides PA Democrats

State Rep. Gerald Mullery said lawmakers could override the governor's veto of a bill that would offer tax breaks to companies that use Pennsylvania natural gas to produce fertilizers and other chemicals.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Plant-based meat has roots in the 1970s

Americans looking to cut back on meat are following a movement forged by a groundbreaking book, ‘Diet for a Small Planet.’
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Damming the lower Mekong, devastating the ways and means of life

Thailand funded the first dam on the river in Laos, and it is Thai towns, farms and fisheries that are suffering.
Toxics

Amid droughts and floods, India’s tribal farmers rediscover the merits of indigenous crop

Farmers found that government-supplied seeds were highly sensitive to even minor climatic disturbances.

www.kpbs.org
Justice

Study: Toxic elements around Salton Sea could adversely affect nearby residents

The problem has to do with selenium-rich fertilizers in the wetland areas surrounding the Salton Sea.
news.mongabay.com
Justice

Habitat loss, climate change make for an uncertain cricket harvest in Uganda

Bush crickets are an important source of food – and income – in Uganda.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Trump removes pollution controls on streams and wetlands

The Trump administration has finished a new rule that rolls back environmental controls on many wetlands and intermittent streams, delivering a win to rural landowners.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The Ganges brims with dangerous bacteria

This sacred river offers clues to the spread of one of the world’s most daunting health problems: germs impervious to common medicines.
From our Newsroom

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

The President’s green comedy routine

A token, triumphal green moment for a president and party who just might need such a thing in an election year.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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