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Toxics

Thirty years after the Montreal Protocol, solving the ozone problem remains elusive.

Despite a ban on chemicals like chlorofluorocarbons, the ozone hole over Antarctica remains nearly as large as it did when the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987. Scientists now warn of new threats to the ozone layer, including widespread use of ozone-eating chemicals not covered by the treaty.

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Justice

California’s plan to tackle a carcinogen widespread in water.

IF YOU DRIVE Highway 99 through California’s Central Valley, you’ll pass through the heart of farm country, where the state’s bounty blooms with hundreds of crops – everything from peaches to pistachios, from tangerines to tomatoes. You’ll also pass through dozens of communities, large and small, whose water systems are tainted by a newly regulated contaminant, 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP), which for decades was used in agricultural fumigants injected into farmland across the Valley.

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Toxics

Produce company behind popular ‘cuties’ fined over pesticide drift.

Kern County agricultural officials announced Tuesday that they are issuing more than $50,000 in fines against two companies for violating pesticide rules in connection with an incident that sickened 37 farmworkers in May.

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Toxics

Two Idaho men drowned in manure ponds. Hundreds of other farmworkers have died too.

It was still dark the morning Ruperto Vazquez-Carrera began his shift at Sunrise Organic Dairy.

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Toxics

Systemic failure: Why 1 million Californians lack safe drinking water.

WOODVILLE, CALIFORNIA – Ralph Gutierrez usually works seven days a week, a punishing schedule he has kept up for the past 14 years. On most days you’ll find him at the office by 6:30 in the morning, the sole occupant of a two-room cement block building with a handful of desks and a “help wanted” sign taped to the front door.

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Toxics

The WHO's cancer agency left in the dark over glyphosate evidence.

LONDON – When Aaron Blair sat down to chair a week-long meeting of 17 specialists at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in France in March 2015, there was something he wasn’t telling them.

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Justice

Were peasant farmers poisoned by the US war on drugs? A jury has the case.

By Spencer S. Hsu April 19 at 7:00 AM

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Toxics

Clean drinking water standards are much harder to enforce than they should be.

Before the California state legislature began cracking down on agricultural pesticide use in the mid-1980s, farmers injected their lands with pest-killing fumigants, oblivious to their toxic effects on humans. Two such pesticides were Telone, made by Dow Chemical, and D-D, made by Shell. Both contained 1,2,3-trichloropropane, or TCP–a carcinogenic byproduct of the processes used to develop soil fumigants, that, even according to the manufacturers, contributed little to the products’ efficacy. TCP never should have been in the pesticides in the first place, but by the time the Dow and Shell stopped manufacturing the products in the mid-80s, the carcinogen had already leaked into the state’s water supply, where it still remains.

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Toxics

Canada government to weed out pesticides from foreign websites.

The federal government is moving to close a loophole that allows Canadians to make legal online purchases of pesticides not registered for use in Canada, and have them shipped into the country.

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Originals

Researchers find pesticide spills, accidents may alter farmworkers’ DNA.

Farmworkers who have a high pesticide exposure event—such as a spill—are more likely to experience molecular changes on DNA that may lead to certain cancers, according to a large U.S. study of pesticide applicators in Iowa and North Carolina.

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From our Newsroom

Chesapeake Energy's fall

Chesapeake Energy was a fracking pioneer on a meteoric rise. Last week, it fell to Earth.

The danger of hormone-mimicking chemicals in medical devices and meds

In an effort to bolster our health, we may be exposed to compounds that harm us. New research says physicians need to recognize and explain this hidden risk to patients.

Our annual summer reading list, 2020 edition

EHN staff shares their top book recommendations for the summer.

Coronavirus is creating a crisis of energy insecurity

Fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic has led to unpaid bills and energy shutoffs in many vulnerable US households. Indiana University researchers warn we need to act now to avoid yet another health emergency.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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