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Miami says it can adapt to rising seas. Not everyone is convinced

Officials have a new plan to manage rising water. Succeed or fail, it will very likely become a case study for other cities facing climate threats.
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Climate

Can we patch up the natural world we've hurt?

In “Under a White Sky,” Elizabeth Kolbert explores the human efforts to confront the effects of climate change, and all their unintended consequences.
Climate

Biden is hiking the cost of carbon. It will change how the U.S. tackles global warming

President Biden is dramatically altering the way the U.S. government calculates the real-world cost of climate change. This approach could reshape a range of consequential decisions, from whether to allow new coal leasing on federal land to what sort of steel is used in taxpayer-funded infrastructure projects.
Justice

The case for, and against, climate optimism

Will the crisis in Texas become the new normal? David Wallace-Wells and Leah Stokes discuss.
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Climate

Jennifer Granholm is confirmed as energy secretary

Ms. Granholm will oversee an agency that plays a leading role in researching and developing new energy technologies.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Coast-to-coast crises waiting to happen

When extreme weather knocked out power and water in Texas last week, it represented a profound warning for the rest of the country: The nation's vital infrastructure remains fundamentally unprepared for the shocks of climate change.

www.nytimes.com
Justice

‘Climate change’ is back, 'illegal alien' is out. New administration changes language of government

“The president has been clear to all of us — words matter, tone matters and civility matters,” said Jen Psaki, the White House press secretary.
www.vox.com
Climate

The latest consequence of climate change: The Arctic is now open for business year-round

The Arctic is now open for business year-round after a large commercial ship sailed the Northern Sea Route from Jiangsu, China, to a Russian gas plant on the Arctic coast, for the first time ever during the month of February, when winter temperatures normally make the icy waterway impassable.

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Climate

John Kerry, at U.N., likens climate inaction to a global ‘suicide pact’

John Kerry’s remarks stood in sharp contrast to the American stance under the previous administration, which tried to block even general mentions of global warming at the world body.
Toxics

Frank Soos: Alaskans are trapped between our economics and our climate

Alaskans find ourselves torn between our collective dependence on revenue from oil and the environmental damage it is causing.

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Climate

What’s really behind corporate promises on climate change?

Many big businesses have not set targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Others have weak goals.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Fight over Deb Haaland, first Native American cabinet pick, reflects partisan divide

President Biden’s choice for interior secretary faces her confirmation hearing on Tuesday. Democrats see her as embodying the hopes of the new administration; Republicans object to her activism.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Companies say they care about the climate. Their actions fall short

Many big businesses have not set targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Others have weak goals.

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Climate

Climate threats could mean big jumps in insurance costs this year

The federal government is revising rates for flood coverage on April 1. New data suggests premiums need to increase sharply for some homes.
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Justice

When there's no heat: 'You need wood, you get wood'

Community wood banks, like food banks, help people in need. Climate change is shaping their role.
From our Newsroom

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

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