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The complicated history of the Kinzua Dam and how it changed life for the seneca people

The Kinzua Dam, which protects Pittsburgh from flooding and pollution, took thousands of acres of the Seneca's territory and destroyed nine communities. We look at the past and future of the Seneca Nation.
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Lisa Werder Brown, the executive director of the Watersheds of South Pittsburgh, showing a flood area at the Beechview-Seldom Seen Greenway in Pittsburgh. (Credit: Terry Clark/PublicSource)
Originals

A Pittsburgh-area test case in working across political boundaries to address flooding

Anthony Wolkiewicz had his picture taken with Fred Rogers while working at WQED in 1977.

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Former water conservationist Tim Guilfoile fishes in the Ohio River. (Credit: Tim Guilfoile via Eye on Ohio)
Originals

We mapped out the toxic wastewater discharges along the Ohio River. Here’s what we learned.

All Tim Guilfoile wants to do is fish. Before his retirement, he had two careers: one in business and one in water quality activism.

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Anglers at the Falls of the Ohio State Park. (Credit: William Alden/flickr)
Originals

Whose job is it to reduce toxic mercury in the Ohio River?

Mercury, which damages young brains, is flowing through industrial wastewater into the Ohio River. But the multi-state agency tasked with keeping the waterway clean hasn't tightened controls on this pollution because it doesn't have the authority to do so.

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Tracy Danzey grew up in Parkersburg, West Virginia, but now lives on the opposite side of the state in its Eastern Panhandle. Danzey was diagnosed with a rare form of bone cancer that led to the amputation of her leg. (Credit: Seth Freeman Photography)
Originals

A lasting legacy: DuPont, C8 contamination and the community of Parkersburg left to grapple with the consequences

PARKERSBURG, W. Va. – Tommy Joyce is no cinephile. The last movie he saw in a theater was the remake of "True Grit" nearly a decade ago. "I'd rather watch squirrels run in the woods" than sit through most of what appears on the big screen, he said.

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Originals

Fighting for the Ohio River watershed’s mussels: Experts are working to get to the bottom of their mysterious disappearances

"Will one of these fit?" Wendell R. Haag asks, holding out a couple pairs of well-worn creeking shoes he's pulled from the back of his pickup, both decidedly larger than a ladies size 8.

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Waterfront Park in Louisville, Kentucky, during the July Forecastle Music Festival. (Credit: Ryan Van Velzer/WFPL)
Originals

The minds behind Louisville’s riverfront revival

In Louisville, Kentucky, the Ohio River has something of an image problem.

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Jim Casto stands up against the tiled river height gauge along the entrance of the floodwall in Huntington, West Virginia. (Credit: Liam Niemeyer, Ohio Valley ReSource)
Originals

Rising waters: Aging levees, climate change and the challenge to hold back the Ohio River

When 78-year-old Jim Casto looks at the towering floodwalls that line downtown Huntington, West Virginia, he sees a dark history of generations past.

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Volunteers help ReNewport Executive Director Josh Tunning (far left) plant trees where they've depaved sections of the sidewalk in Newport, Kentucky. (Credit: Bonnie Jean Feldkamp/Eye on Ohio)
Originals

The Ohio River community of Newport bands together to slow runoff and add greenspace

The city of Newport, Kentucky, is shaped on its north and west borders by the Ohio and Licking rivers. And while Newport hosts entertainment venues and a bourbon distillery bolstered by views of Cincinnati's skyline, its geography and history also create challenges.

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Justice

RiverWise brings sustainability to Beaver County

The group's executive director says the debate around the ethane cracker being built in his county is predictable. Instead of being for or against it, his group is ready to "do the hard work of developing healthy and creative community together."

Children

On the most populated Ohio River island, this beekeeper found a way to better himself and his community

Dave Watkins lives on Wheeling Island, the most populated island along the Ohio River.

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Nurdle Patrol participant Sam Sugarek shows off a nurdle found along the beaches of Texas. (Credit: Jace Tunnell)
Originals

Ever hear of a nurdle? This new form of pollution could be coming to the Ohio River

When the petrochemical plant being built by Shell Chemical Appalachia in Beaver County is complete, it's anticipated to bring 600 jobs as well as spinoff industries. But some researchers and activists warn that it could also bring a new type of pollution to the Ohio River Valley — nurdles.

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Originals

Fighting pollution and apathy on the Lower Ohio

NEW ALBANY, Ind. — When Jason Flickner was a kid, he built a dam on the creek behind his grandparents' house causing it to flood a neighbor's basement.

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Illustration of the R.E. Burger power plant by David Wilson/Belt Magazine.
Originals

What the petrochemical buildout along the Ohio River means for regional communities and beyond

The R.E. Burger coal-fired power plant's final day ended, appropriately enough, in a cloud of black smoke and dust.

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The author overlooking the Ohio River on the North Side section of the Three Rivers Heritage Trail off of Route 65 in Pittsburgh.
Originals

Tracing water, memory and change through Black experiences along and near Pennsylvania's Route 65

I live right above the Ohio River, off of a thoroughfare called the Ohio River Boulevard.

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From our Newsroom

Veeps and the environment

On the environment, Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris are worlds apart. But don't expect it to be front and center in the campaigning.

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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