What if DuPont had gone green in North Carolina?

DuPont never ramped up a greener production technique that the company licensed from UNC that might have reduced demand for chemicals like GenX years ago.

By Catherine Clabby

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Toxics

CMU chemical promises to rid 99 percent of BPA from wastewater.

CMU Chemical Promises To Rid 99 Percent Of BPA From Wastewater

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Stephan Arnold/Unsplash
Originals

Science: Pay attention to two other messages in the breakthrough BPA water treatment paper.

Science: Pay attention to two other messages in the breakthrough BPA water treatment paper

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Toxics

Chemists remove 99 per cent of BPA from water in 30 minutes.

Our water is full of BPA, a potentially dangerous chemical, but chemists at Carnegie Mellon University may have a solution.

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Marufish/flickr
Originals

BPA breakthrough: New treatment takes controversial chemical out of water.

As water treatment plants struggle to keep up with the chemical cocktail heading into our pipes, researchers say they’ve come up with a solution to remove one of the most ubiquitous contaminants—BPA.

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Toxics

Lego could solve the world's plastics pollution problem if it can find a biomaterial that can survive generations of play.

In March, the Lego Group unveiled the world’s tallest Lego wind turbine to celebrate having met its 100% renewable-energy target three years ahead of schedule.

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Toxics

Chemical giants see growth in green, clean tech.

(Reuters) - Chemical companies Dow Chemical Co and DuPont are seeing increased benefits in building sustainable "green" products, as they look for newer avenues of growth and build a stronger connection with millenials.

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Toxics

My week without plastic: 'I found a toothbrush made of pig hair.'

It’s in shampoo bottles, toothbrushes, clothes and biros. It’s even in teabags. Plastic is everywhere.

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Toxics

Eco-friendly plastics made using lemon extracts, CO2.

London, Jul 17 (PTI) Scientists have developed eco- friendly plastics using lemon extracts and carbon dioxide that may replace potentially cancer-causing materials widely used in everyday items like phone cases, baby bottles and DVDs.

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Bill Gillette/Wikimedia
Toxics

Sewage rehab.

Compounds that mimic or disrupt human hormones are showing up in freshwater ecosystems worldwide. This widespread pollution is causing the feminization of fish and amphibians, as well as the disruption of natural freshwater microbial communities. It’s even making fish anxious. For people, living near to such polluted waterways is associated with an elevated risk of some cancers. The presence of hormones and hormone disruptors is not a new problem, but it’s one that waste treatment experts have been struggling to solve. These compounds sneak through many conventional wastewater treatment systems. But they don’t have to.

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Toxics

Sleeping with the fishes — decay in wastewater damages aquatic life.

BY SHERYL WOOD YESTERDAY 8:42 AM

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Toxics

Green chemistry efforts honored.

Green chemistry efforts honored

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Toxics

Pesticides can cause brain damage and organic food is the future, EU report says.

Eating food with high levels of pesticides has an adverse effect on the brain, according to a review of existing scientific evidence commissioned by the European Parliament.

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Toxics

These shoes help clean lakes – because they're made of polluting algae.

The new water-resistant Ultra II’s have a little less oil, because some of it’s been replaced by the massive clouds of algae that have been poisoning a Chinese lake.

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Toxics

Microplastics plague Indian River Lagoon.

The crabs and oysters we eat from the Indian River Lagoon harbor tiny bits of plastic, with unknown health risks to us and to them, new research suggests.

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