Move over, hippies.

Back-to-the-landers who created the state's cannabis-growing industry decades ago may be left behind when the button-down crowd takes control of the new era of legal weed.

During the social revolution of the '60s and '70s, cannabis was an emblem of rebellion. For many, smoking pot was a way to thumb their noses at a repressive society that had falsely demonized the free-growing weed as addictive and dangerous. And when back-to-the-landers fled San Francisco and Berkeley for the northland hills of Humboldt, Mendocino, and Trinity counties, cannabis farming allowed them an alternative to button-down conformity. By growing cannabis, they could live off the grid and create their own lifestyles. Simply put, cannabis allowed them an outlaw freedom.

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Toxics

Test tube babies in a conflict zone: Dealing with infertility in Gaza.

The Gaza Strip was a month into this summer’s suffocating electricity crisis when Thair Salah Mortaja became a father for the first time. He had spent thousands of dollars to overcome infertility – first paying for drugs, then a futile operation, and finally for costly in vitro fertilisation (IVF) – but the struggle for parenthood did not end there.

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Toxics

Trading old hazards for new?

Industry and government officials say PFOA, the toxic chemical blamed for contaminating drinking water supplies in Hoosick Falls and several other area communities, is no longer used in manufacturing in the United States.

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Toxics

Workplace carcinogens lead to thousands of cancer cases in Ontario each year: Study.

Workplace exposure to carcinogens such as diesel exhaust, asbestos and silica are together causing thousands of cancer cases in Ontario each year, says a new study that reveals the toll of on-the-job hazardous substances.

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Justice

Milwaukee is showing how urban gardening can heal a city.

It’s a chilly spring morning in Milwaukee; rain falls softly from a pigeon-gray sky. Yet here, in a parking lot in a rundown section of town, a couple dozen volunteers have assembled for the Victory Garden Initiative‘s (VGI) ninth-annual “Blitz.” They will spend this soggy Saturday building raised-bed gardens in yards across town—from the suburbs to the urban core. Over the course of the two-week event, they will prepare more than 500 beds, adding to the 3,000 gardens VGI has already installed throughout the city.

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Toxics

Trump's pick for EPA safety chief argued kids are less sensitive to chemical toxicity.

MICHAEL DOURSON, THE toxicologist who will be the subject of a confirmation hearing on Wednesday for what many consider the second most powerful post at the Environmental Protection Agency, has been hired by industry to consult on at least 30 of the chemicals he may be responsible for reviewing if he assumes office.

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Justice

Alaskans push US government to investigate BC’s border mines.

Fish and wildlife in Alaska’s major watersheds are threatened by six British Columbia mines close to the Alaska border, according to a new petition that asks U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross to investigate the threat of acid-mine drainage, heavy metals pollution and the possibility of catastrophic dam failure originating in the Canadian province.

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PennFuture
Toxics

Enviro group names names in new anti-pollution campaign.

A Pennsylvania environmental group is launching an ad campaign against two large industrial facilities near Pittsburgh.

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Toxics

Hindu festival chokes Indian waterways with flowers and idol debris.

Sections of a major river in Delhi are choking with plastic, flowers and debris after an annual Hindu festival in which hundreds of idols were immersed in Indian waterways.

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From our Newsroom

The draw—and deadlines—of American denial

From vaccines to elections to climate change, denial is doing lasting damage to the country.

What do politicians have to say about 'Fractured?'

Here are the responses we've gotten so far from politicians about our study that found Pennsylvania families living near fracking wells are being exposed to high levels of harmful industrial chemicals.

Planting a million trees in the semi-arid desert to combat climate change

Tucson's ambitious tree planting goal aims to improve the health of residents, wildlife, and the watershed.

“Allow suffering to speak:” Treating the oppressive roots of illness

By connecting the dots between medical symptoms and patterns of injustice, we move from simply managing suffering to delivering a lasting cure.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

Living near fracking wells is linked to higher rate of heart attacks: Study

Middle-aged men in Pennsylvania's fracking counties die from heart attacks at a rate 5% greater than their counterparts in New York where fracking is banned.

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