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BPA substitutes linked to obesity in children and teens

"Replacing BPA with similar chemicals does nothing to mitigate the harms chemical exposure has on our health"

Two chemicals used as substitutes for bisphenol A (BPA) may contribute to childhood weight gain and obesity, according to a study published today in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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Jerry Heindel: A new hub for the science of hormone disruptors

When I was a Scientific Program Administrator at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) I saw a lot of scientists doing strong research on endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).

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In a scientific first, researchers gave people BPA — and saw a link to precursor of type 2 diabetes

A first-of-its-kind study of a small group of people exposed to a very small amount of bisphenol-A (BPA) is raising questions about the federal government's stance that low doses of the common chemical are safe — as well as the ethics of conducting such an experiment on humans.

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