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BPA substitutes linked to obesity in children and teens

Two chemicals used as substitutes for bisphenol A (BPA) may contribute to childhood weight gain and obesity, according to a study published today in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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Originals

Jerry Heindel: A new hub for the science of hormone disruptors

When I was a Scientific Program Administrator at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) I saw a lot of scientists doing strong research on endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).

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Originals

In a scientific first, researchers gave people BPA — and saw a link to precursor of type 2 diabetes

A first-of-its-kind study of a small group of people exposed to a very small amount of bisphenol-A (BPA) is raising questions about the federal government's stance that low doses of the common chemical are safe — as well as the ethics of conducting such an experiment on humans.

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